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Research Papers

A New Model for the Prediction of Width Spread in Roughing Mills

[+] Author and Article Information
Dong Hoon Lee

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
POSTECH,
Pohang 790-784, South Korea
e-mail: wwffri@postech.ac.kr

Kyong Bo Lee

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
POSTECH,
Pohang 790-784, South Korea
e-mail: kyongbo@postech.ac.kr

Jae Sang Lee

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
POSTECH,
Pohang 790-784, South Korea
e-mail: Ljs5119@postech.ac.kr

Sung Jin Yun

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
POSTECH,
Pohang 790-784, South Korea
e-mail: sungjin@postech.ac.kr

Tae Jin Shin

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
POSTECH,
Pohang 790-784, South Korea
e-mail: tjshin@postech.ac.kr

Sang Moo Hwang

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
POSTECH,
Pohang 790-784, South Korea
e-mail: smhwang@postech.ac.kr

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Manufacturing Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF MANUFACTURING SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING. Manuscript received January 8, 2014; final manuscript received June 25, 2014; published online August 6, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Gracious Ngaile.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 136(5), 051014 (Aug 06, 2014) (9 pages) Paper No: MANU-14-1011; doi: 10.1115/1.4027970 History: Received January 08, 2014; Revised June 25, 2014

Precision control of the slab width is crucial for product quality and production economy in roughing mill. In this paper, we present a new model for the prediction of the width spread of a slab during rolling in the roughing train of a hot strip mill. The approach is based on the extremum principle for rigid plastic materials, and applicable to horizontal rolling of a slab with either a dog-bone shaped cross section or a rectangular cross section. Also, the upper bound theorem is used for calculating the width spread of a slab. The prediction accuracy of the proposed model is examined through comparison with the predictions from the 3D finite element (FE) process simulations.

Copyright © 2014 by ASME
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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Width spread in a roughing train (top view)

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Fig. 2

Definition sketch of flat rolling. Only a quadrant of the rolling geometry is shown.

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Fig. 3

Change in the width of a small element in the bite zone, lateral spread, etc.

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Fig. 4

A mathematical representation of a dog-bone shaped cross section. A1 represents the area above the line z = H1(0), A2 represents the area below the line z = H1(0), bp represents the distance from the edge to the peak, and hp represents the dog-bone height. For dog-bone profile I, an eighth order polynomial is used, while a fourth order polynomial is used for dog-bone profile II.

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Fig. 5

FE simulation of width spread in flat rolling of a bar with the dog-bone shaped cross section. H1(0) = 40.675 mm, H2 = 28.473 mm, b = 142.363 mm, and R = 600 mm.

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Fig. 6

Lateral displacements in the bite zone across the bar width. H1(0) = 62.5 mm, H2 = 50 mm, b = 570 mm, and R = 600 mm. Line no. 1 indicates the lateral displacement at the roll entrance, while line no. 10 indicates the lateral displacement at the roll exit. α1 = 3.9627 is used.

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Fig. 7

Lateral displacements in the bite zone along the rolling direction. H1(0) = 62.5 mm, H2 = 50 mm, b = 570 mm, and R = 600 mm. Line no. 1 indicates the lateral displacement at the center of the bar, while line no. 10 indicates the lateral displacement at the edge. α1 = 3.9627 is used.

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Fig. 8

Width spread for the problem of a dog-bone shaped inlet cross section. Comparison between predictions from the present model and those from FEM. The data represent change in the whole width (not half width) after rolling.

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Fig. 9

The effect of dog-bone profile on width spread

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Fig. 10

Width spread for the problem of a rectangular inlet cross section. Comparison between predictions from the present model (P(x) = Q(x)) and those from FEM. The data represents change in the whole width (not half width) after rolling.

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Fig. 11

Lateral displacement in the bite zone along the rolling direction, predictions from FEM. H1 = 24.19 mm, H2 = 19.35 mm, and b = 84.66 mm. Line no. 1 indicates the lateral displacement at the roll entrance, while line no. 10 indicates the lateral displacement at the roll exit. α1 = 4.3314 and c = 2.165 is used.

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Fig. 12

Lateral displacement in the bite zone along the rolling direction, Predictions from FEM. H1 = 24.19 mm, H2 = 19.35 mm, and b = 84.66 mm. Line no. 1 indicates the lateral displacement at the center, while line no. 10 indicates the lateral displacement at the edge of the slab. α1 = 4.3314 and c = 2.165 is used.

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Fig. 13

Effect of s and r on c. γ = 3.5.

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Fig. 14

c values, comparison between predictions from the proposed equation and those from FE simulation. The range of s: 0.75–1.75, the range of r: 0.1–0.3, and the range of γ: 3.5–13.5.

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Fig. 15

Width spread for the problem of a rectangular inlet cross section. Comparison between predictions from the present model and those from FEM. The data represent change in the whole width (not half width) after rolling.

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Fig. 16

Width spread for the problem of a rectangular inlet cross section. Comparison between predictions from the Shibahara model [6] and those from FEM. The data represent change in the whole width (not half width) after rolling.

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