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Research Papers

Fabrication and Tribological Functions of Microdent Arrays on Ti–6Al–4V Surface by Laser Shock Peening

[+] Author and Article Information
R. Caslaru, M. P. Sealy

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
The University of Alabama,
Tuscaloosa, AL 35487

Y. B. Guo

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
The University of Alabama,
Tuscaloosa, AL 35487
e-mail: yguo@eng.ua.edu

X. T. Wei

School of Mechanical Engineering,
Shandong University of Technology,
Zibo 255049, China

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Manufacturing Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF MANUFACTURING SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING. Manuscript received March 12, 2014; final manuscript received June 20, 2014; published online August 12, 2014. Editor: Y. Lawrence Yao.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 136(5), 051020 (Aug 12, 2014) (8 pages) Paper No: MANU-14-1107; doi: 10.1115/1.4027918 History: Received March 12, 2014; Revised June 20, 2014

Surface patterning has become a valuable technique for fabricating microdents, which may act as lubricant reservoirs to reduce friction and wear in sliding and rolling contact applications. In this paper, the use of laser shock peening (LSP) along with an automatic X–Y table proves to be an attractive and reliable method for producing microdent arrays with enhanced surface integrity. Surface topography and profiles of the fabricated microdent arrays on polished Ti–6Al–4V have been characterized. The effect of dent arrays with different density on friction reduction at low and high viscosity lubrication was investigated. An acoustic emission (AE) sensor was used to online monitor friction and wear processes. It was found that a surface with 10% dent density provides better effect in reducing coefficient of friction (CoF) than those of smooth surface and a surface with 20% dent density. It was shown that there is a strong correlation between AE energy signals and wear rate.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

LSP experimental setup

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Fig. 2

Sliding contact tracks at different dent density

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Fig. 3

Dent profiles at different peening power

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Fig. 4

Fabricated dent array and 3D topography at 1 W laser power (20% density)

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Fig. 5

Tribology testing setup

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Fig. 6

The effect of surface patterning on friction coefficient

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Fig. 7

Wear track profiles at high viscosity lubrication conditions

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Fig. 8

Wear track profiles at low viscosity lubrication conditions

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Fig. 9

Calculated wear rate at high viscosity lubrication conditions

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Fig. 10

Calculated wear rate at low viscosity lubrication conditions

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Fig. 11

AE energy at high viscosity lubrication conditions

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Fig. 12

AE energy at low viscosity lubrication conditions

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