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Research Papers

Dynamic Modeling and Vibration Response Simulation for High Speed Rolling Ball Bearings With Localized Surface Defects in Raceways

[+] Author and Article Information
Linkai Niu

State Key Laboratory for Manufacturing
Systems Engineering,
Xi'an Jiaotong University,
Xi'an 710049, PR China
e-mail: niulinkai@stu.xjtu.edu.cn

Hongrui Cao

Associate Professor
State Key Laboratory for Manufacturing
Systems Engineering,
Xi'an Jiaotong University,
Xi'an 710049, PR China
e-mail: chr@mail.xjtu.edu.cn

Zhengjia He

Professor
State Key Laboratory for Manufacturing
Systems Engineering,
Xi'an Jiaotong University,
Xi'an 710049, PR China
e-mail: hzj@mail.xjtu.edu.cn

Yamin Li

State Key Laboratory for Manufacturing
Systems Engineering,
Xi'an Jiaotong University,
Xi'an 710049, PR China
e-mail: huishita.liyamin@stu.xjtu.edu.cn

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Manufacturing Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF MANUFACTURING SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING. Manuscript received December 28, 2013; final manuscript received March 27, 2014; published online May 21, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Tony Schmitz.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 136(4), 041015 (May 21, 2014) (16 pages) Paper No: MANU-13-1439; doi: 10.1115/1.4027334 History: Received December 28, 2013; Revised March 27, 2014

A dynamic model is developed to investigate vibrations of high speed rolling ball bearings with localized surface defects on raceways. In this model, each bearing component (i.e., inner raceway, outer raceway and rolling ball) has six degrees of freedom (DOFs) to completely describe its dynamic characteristics in three-dimensional space. Gyroscopic moment, centrifugal force, lubrication traction/slip between bearing component are included owing to high speed effects. Moreover, local defects are modeled accurately and completely with consideration of additional deflection due to material absence, changes of Hertzian contact coefficient and changes of contact force directions due to raceway curvature variations. The obtained equations of motion are solved numerically using the fourth order Runge–Kutta–Fehlberg scheme with step-changing criterion. Vibration responses of a defective bearing with localized surface defects are simulated and analyzed in both time domain and frequency domain, and the effectiveness of fault feature extraction techniques is also discussed. An experiment is carried out on an aerospace bearing test rig. By comparing the simulation results with experiments, it is confirmed that the proposed model is capable of predicting vibration responses of defective high speed rolling ball bearings effectively.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Ball/raceway interaction

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Fig. 2

Angular position of the defect in bearing circumference

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Fig. 3

Geometric description of a defect in a raceway

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Fig. 4

Variations of contact force direction and raceway curvature

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Fig. 5

Geometry of contacting bodies

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Fig. 7

Flow chart for numerical computation

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Fig. 8

Traction model of the lubricant in simulation

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Fig. 9

Relationship between |mod(θball,2π)-θd| and θe

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Fig. 10

Motion characteristics of a ball when it rolls over the defect: (a) contact forces, (b) the detail view of contact forces, (c) the schema when a ball rolls over the defect, and (d) components of impact force

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Fig. 11

Relationships between contact forces and shaft speeds: (a) the maximum contact force and (b) entry points at different shaft speeds

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Fig. 12

Vibration responses of pedestal at 3000 r/min (a) radial acceleration and (b) detail views of acceleration and contact force

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Fig. 13

Vibration responses of pedestal at 10,000 r/min (a) radial acceleration and (b) detail views of acceleration and contact force

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Fig. 14

Relationship between the maximum contact force and defect width

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Fig. 15

Relationship between radial acceleration and defect width

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Fig. 16

Contact forces of a radial loaded bearing

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Fig. 17

Relationship between the maximum contact force and θd

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Fig. 18

Radial acceleration and contact force

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Fig. 19

Vibration responses of the bearing with defected outer raceway: (a) radial acceleration, (b) detail view of radial acceleration, (c) frequency spectrum, and (d) envelope spectrum

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Fig. 20

Investigation of fel and feh: (a) impact force, (b) the corresponding vibrations, and (c) frequency spectrum

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Fig. 21

Vibration responses of the bearing with defected inner raceway: (a) radial acceleration, (b) detail view of radial acceleration, (c) frequency spectrum, and (d) envelope spectrum

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Fig. 22

Orbit speed of ball 1 under both axial and radial loads

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Fig. 23

Components of impact forces result from inner raceway defect

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Fig. 24

Setup of the aerospace bearing test rig

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Fig. 25

A spall of the failure bearing

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Fig. 26

Experimental results: (a) radial acceleration, (b) frequency spectrum, and (c) envelope spectrum

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Fig. 27

Simulated results: (a) contact force distribution, (b) radial acceleration, (c) frequency spectrum, and (d) envelope spectrum

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