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Technology Review

Machining of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics/Polymers: A Literature Review

[+] Author and Article Information
Demeng Che

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Northwestern University,
Evanston, IL 60208
e-mail: dche@u.northwestern.edu

Ishan Saxena

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Northwestern University,
Evanston, IL 60208
e-mail: ishansaxena2013@u.northwestern.edu

Peidong Han

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Northwestern University,
Evanston, IL 60208
e-mail: peidonghan2014@u.northwestern.edu

Ping Guo

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Northwestern University,
Evanston, IL 60208
e-mail: pingguo2009@u.northwestern.edu

Kornel F. Ehmann

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Northwestern University,
Evanston, IL 60208
e-mail: k-ehmann@northwestern.edu

Manuscript received August 13, 2013; final manuscript received January 17, 2014; published online March 26, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Patrick Kwon.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 136(3), 034001 (Mar 26, 2014) (22 pages) Paper No: MANU-13-1309; doi: 10.1115/1.4026526 History: Received August 13, 2013; Revised January 17, 2014

Carbon fiber reinforced plastics/polymers (CFRPs) offer excellent mechanical properties that lead to enhanced functional performance and, in turn, wide applications in numerous industrial fields. Post machining of CFRPs is an essential procedure that assures that the manufactured components meet their dimensional tolerances, surface quality and other functional requirements, which is currently considered an extremely difficult process due to the highly nonlinear, inhomogeneous, and abrasive nature of CFRPs. In this paper, a comprehensive literature review on machining of CFRPs is given with a focus on five main issues including conventional and unconventional hybrid processes for CFRP machining, cutting theories and thermal/mechanical response studies, numerical simulations, tool performance and tooling techniques, and economic impacts of CFRP machining. Given the similarities in the experimental and theoretical studies related to the machining of glass fiber reinforced polymers (GFRPs) and other FRPs parallel insights are drawn to CFRP machining to offer additional understanding of on-going and promising attempts in CFRP machining.

Copyright © 2014 by ASME
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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Material properties of CFRPs governing the machinability of CFRPs [5]

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Fig. 2

Machining of CFRPs: (a) milling; (b) drilling; and (c) trimming [40]

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Fig. 3

Different drill types: (a) twist drill; (b) candle stick drill; and (c) saw drill [44]

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Fig. 4

Experimental setup for vibration-assisted drilling [55]

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Fig. 5

Experimental setup for ultrasonic vibration cutting [56]

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Fig. 6

Apparatus for laser assisted turning of a metal matrix composites [59]

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Fig. 7

Microscope image of a separated CFRP layer cut by laser ablation [61]

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Fig. 8

Cause-effect-diagram of laser beam cutting of CFRP [62]

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Fig. 9

Schematic diagram of jet cutting [66]

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Fig. 10

The definitions of cutting variables [3]

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Fig. 11

Cutting mechanisms in orthogonal machining of Gr/Ep [7]

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Fig. 12

Chip formation mechanism during FRP machining [10]

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Fig. 13

Bending failure in FRP cutting with 90 deg fiber orientation: (a) prior to failure and (b) after failure [72]

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Fig. 14

Definition of deformation zones when fiber orientation is smaller than 90 deg [74]

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Fig. 15

Force responses at CFRP-tool interface [18]

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Fig. 16

Schematic illustration of the cutting mechanism for UD-FRP [84]

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Fig. 17

Chip subject to cutting force [72]

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Fig. 18

Cutting force versus fiber angle of an anisotropic material in experiment and simulation [94]

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Fig. 19

The dominant effect of fiber orientation on failure mechanisms in CFRP machining: (a) 0 deg simulation result; (b) 90 deg simulation result; and (c) 135 deg simulation result [103]

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Fig. 20

Effect of tool geometry on sub-surface damage: (a) rounded tool; and (b) sharp tool [103]

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Fig. 21

Evolution of chip formation in 3D FEM modeling of CFRP cutting [104]

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Fig. 22

Interfacial fracture for 45 deg fiber orientation: (a) before simulation; (b) after simulation; (c) cohesive zone after simulation [106]

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Fig. 23

DEM model of microbond test [112]

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Fig. 24

Chip formation in orthogonal cutting of UD-CFRPs at 90 deg: (a) DEM simulation, (b) experimental image [108]

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Fig. 25

Chipping of the WC drill in high speed drilling of CFRP [116]

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Fig. 26

Uniform pattern in flank wear on P30 tools [28]

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Fig. 27

Micrograph of a worn-out PCD tool during CFRP machining [10]

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Fig. 28

Micrographs of worn out nose region [114]

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Fig. 29

Relative tool sliding direction with respect to fiber orientation of the composite [128]

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Fig. 30

Comparison of core-saw drill and core drill: (a) core-saw drill and (b) core drill [132]

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Fig. 31

Tool materials used in CFRP cutting [133]

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Fig. 32

Relative hole quality with different tool materials [140]

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Fig. 33

Tool materials used to drill polymeric composites [22]

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Fig. 34

Multilayer diamond coating on a tungsten carbide tool [146]

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Fig. 35

Modified geometries of diamond-carbide interface [151]

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Fig. 36

Cutting edge preparations [154]

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Fig. 37

Consumption of carbon fibers in the global market [159]

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