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Research Papers

Investigation of Flux Decline in Tortuous Pore Structures via Three-Dimensional Simulation of Cross-Flow Microfilter Fouling

[+] Author and Article Information
Bingyi Yu

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign,
Department of Mechanical Science
and Engineering,
1206 West Green Street,
Urbana, IL 61801
e-mail: yu59@illinois.edu

Shiv G. Kapoor

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign,
Department of Mechanical Science
and Engineering,
1206 West Green Street,
Urbana, IL 61801
e-mail: sgkapoor@illinois.edu

Richard E. DeVor

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign,
Department of Mechanical Science
and Engineering,
1206 West Green Street,
Urbana, IL 61801
e-mail: redevor@illinois.edu

John E. Wentz

University of St. Thomas,
School of Engineering,
2115 Summit Avenue,
Saint Paul, MN 55105
e-mail: went2252@stthomas.edu

1Corresponding author.

Manuscript received July 27, 2011; final manuscript received October 24, 2013; published online March 26, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Tony Schmitz.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 136(3), 031001 (Mar 26, 2014) (8 pages) Paper No: MANU-11-1257; doi: 10.1115/1.4026430 History: Received July 27, 2011; Revised October 24, 2013

This paper presents a fluid dynamic-based approach to the prediction of the flux decline due to partial and complete pore blocking in the microfiltration process. The electrostatic force model includes both particle–particle (PP) and particle–membrane (PM) electrostatic forces. The addition of such forces was shown to affect particle trajectories in a tortuous three-dimensional microfilter membrane geometry. The model was validated by comparing experimental flux decline data with simulation flux decline data. A design of experiments was conducted to investigate the effects of transmembrane pressure, PM- and PP-zeta potential on flux decline. The simulation experiments revealed that low flux decline was associated with relatively low transmembrane pressures and near-zero values of PP- and PM-zeta potential; and relatively high transmembrane pressures and more-negative values of PP- and PM-zeta potential. The amount of flux decline was shown to be correlated to the specific nature of partial and complete pore blocking in the pore structure.

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References

Yu, B., Kapoor, S. G., and DeVor, R. E., 2010, “Three-Dimensional Simulation of Cross-Flow Microfilter Fouling in Tortuous Pore Profiles With Semi-Synthetic Metalworking Fluids,” Proceedings of the ASME 2010 International Manufacturing Science and Engineering, Oct. 12–15, 2010, Erie, PA.
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Figures

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Fig. 1

Electrostatic force of a particle against an infinite flat plate (adapted from Bhattacharjee and Elimelech [8])

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Fig. 2

Simulated particle geometry showing the surface subdivided into particle surface elements

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Fig. 3

Particle trajectories employing: (a) hydrodynamics only, (b) PP-electrostatic forces via the Derjaguin approximation, and (c) PP- and PM-electrostatic forces via the enhanced electrostatic force model

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Fig. 4

Experimental setup [14]

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Fig. 5

Experimental flux decline profile and fitted Zhao et al. model

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Fig. 6

Tortuous pore geometry 1 (left) and 2 (right)

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Fig. 7

Simulation flux data and the simplified Zhao et al. model

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Fig. 8

Trapped particles via the enhanced fluid dynamic model operating at a transmembrane pressure of 16.3 kPa and PP- and PM-zeta potentials of −75 mV (simulation experiment test number 9)

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Fig. 9

Contour diagrams for % flux decline varying two input variables, operating at transmembrane pressures of (a) 10 kPa, (b) 25 kPa, and (c) 40 kPa

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Fig. 10

Results of simulation experiment. (a) Test number 2, (b) test number 5, (c) test number 6, and (d) test number 9. Secondary pore locations are circled only in Fig. 11(a) to maintain visual clarity

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Fig. 11

Results of simulation experiment. (a) Test number 2 and (b) test number 4

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