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Research Papers

A Theoretical Assessment of Surface Defect Machining and Hot Machining of Nanocrystalline Silicon Carbide

[+] Author and Article Information
Saurav Goel

School of Mechanical
and Aerospace Engineering,
Queen's University, Belfast BT95AH, UK
e-mail:.s.goel@qub.ac.uk

Waleed Bin Rashid

Institute of Mechanical, Process
and Energy Engineering,
Heriot-Watt University,
Edinburgh EH144AS, UK

Xichun Luo

Department of Design, Manufacture
and Engineering Management,
University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G11XQ, UK

Anupam Agrawal

Department of Business Administration,
University of Illinois
at Urbana Champaign, IL 61820

V. K. Jain

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Indian Institute of Technology,
Kanpur 208016, India

Readers are requested to refer to the web based version of this article for correct interpretation of the colour legends.

Red and grey bodies represent two different species of atoms in a single molecule.

Readers are requested to refer to the web based version of this article for correct interpretation of the colour legends.

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Manufacturing Engineering of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF MANUFACTURING SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING. Manuscript received August 7, 2012; final manuscript received December 18, 2013; published online February 10, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Suhas Joshi.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 136(2), 021015 (Feb 10, 2014) (12 pages) Paper No: MANU-12-1239; doi: 10.1115/1.4026297 History: Received August 07, 2012; Revised December 18, 2013

In this paper, a newly proposed machining method named “surface defect machining” (SDM) was explored for machining of nanocrystalline beta silicon carbide (3C-SiC) at 300 K using MD simulation. The results were compared with isothermal high temperature machining at 1200 K under the same machining parameters, emulating ductile mode micro laser assisted machining (μ-LAM) and with conventional cutting at 300 K. In the SDM simulation, surface defects were generated on the top of the (010) surface of the 3C-SiC work piece prior to cutting, and the workpiece was then cut along the 〈100〉 direction using a single point diamond cutting tool at a cutting speed of 10 m/s. Cutting forces, subsurface deformation layer depth, temperature in the shear zone, shear plane angle and friction coefficient were used to characterize the response of the workpiece. Simulation results showed that SDM provides a unique advantage of decreased shear plane angle which eases the shearing action. This in turn causes an increased value of average coefficient of friction in contrast to the isothermal cutting (carried at 1200 K) and normal cutting (carried at 300 K). The increase of friction coefficient, however, was found to aid the cutting action of the tool due to an intermittent dropping in the cutting forces, lowering stresses on the cutting tool and reduced operational temperature. Analysis shows that the introduction of surface defects prior to conventional machining can be a viable choice for machining a wide range of ceramics, hard steels and composites compared to hot machining.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 3

Stresses in the cutting zone [5]

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Fig. 2

Molecular dynamics simulation procedure (a) the initial positions of the molecules2 are specified (b) force on each atom due to the other atoms in its neighborhood is calculated. (c) Potential energy function predicts the newer positions and velocities of the atoms at specified time [54].

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Fig. 1

Schematic of MD simulation model

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Fig. 4

Potential energy function for molecular interactions in the molecular mechanics approximation [54]

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Fig. 13

Variation in the temperature of the cutting edge during nanometric cutting of 3C-SiC

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Fig. 14

Variation in von Mises stress acting on the tool during nanometric cutting of 3C-SiC

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Fig. 15

Variation in shear stress acting on the tool during nanometric cutting of 3C-SiC

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Fig. 11

Chip morphology of 3C-SiC while cutting the workpiece after tool advances to 8.3 nm

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Fig. 12

Subsurface crystal lattice deformation of 3C-SiC after tool advances to 8.3 nm

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Fig. 5

Snapshot from MD simulation for 3C-SiC specimen without creation of surface defects

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Fig. 6

Snapshot from MD simulation for 3C-SiC specimen with surface defects on top

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Fig. 7

Schematic diagram of chip formation during single point diamond turning [50]

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Fig. 8

Tangential cutting forces during nanometric cutting of 3C-SiC in three cases

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Fig. 9

Thrust forces during nanometric cutting of 3C-SiC in three cases

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Fig. 10

Cutting forces using (a) normal hard turning and (b) surface defect machining [1]

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Fig. 16

MD simulation showing various stages of each machining action [2]

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