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Technical Brief

Deburring Effect of Plasma Produced by Nanosecond Laser Ablation

[+] Author and Article Information
Yun Zhou

Electro Scientific Industries, Inc.,
48660 Kato Road,
Fremont, CA 94538

Yibo Gao

Department of Mechanical,
Materials and Aerospace Engineering,
Illinois Institute of Technology,
10 W. 32nd Street, Engineering 1 Building,
Chicago, IL 60616

Benxin Wu

Department of Mechanical,
Materials and Aerospace Engineering,
Illinois Institute of Technology,
10 W. 32nd Street, Engineering 1 Building,
Chicago, IL 60616
e-mail: bwu11@iit.edu

Sha Tao

Advanced Optowave Corporation,
105 Comac Street,
Ronkonkoma, NY 11779

Ze Liu

Department of Mechanical, Materials
and Aerospace Engineering,
Illinois Institute of Technology,
10 W. 32nd Street, Engineering 1 Building,
Chicago, IL 60616

1Corresponding author.

Manuscript received September 9, 2012; final manuscript received August 26, 2013; published online January 15, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Robert Landers.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 136(2), 024501 (Jan 15, 2014) (5 pages) Paper No: MANU-12-1270; doi: 10.1115/1.4025910 History: Received September 09, 2012; Revised August 26, 2013

This paper presents an interesting nanosecond (ns) laser-induced plasma deburring (LPD) effect (from microchannel sidewalls) discovered by the authors, which has been rarely reported before in the literature. Fast imagining study has been performed on plasma produced by ns laser ablation of the bottom of microchannels. It has been found that the plasma can effectively remove burrs from the sidewall of the channels, while on the other hand microscopic images taken in this study did not show any obvious size or shape change of the channel sidewall after LPD. LPD using a sacrifice plate has also been studied, where the plasma for deburring is generated by laser ablation of the sacrifice plate instead of the workpiece. The observed laser-induced plasma deburring effect has several potential advantages in practical micromanufacturing applications, such as high spatial resolution, noncontact and no tool wear, and less possibility of damaging or overmachining useful microfeatures when removing burrs from them. The fundamental mechanisms for the observed laser-induced plasma deburring effect still require lots of further work to completely understand, which may include mechanical breaking of burrs due to high kinetic energies carried by plasma and the associated shock wave, and/or thermal transport from plasma to burrs that may cause their heating and phase change, or other mechanisms.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic of the fast imaging system and the workpiece sample with microchannels (a lens with a focal length of 100 mm is located inside the scanner)

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Fig. 2

The first and last column: ICCD images of microchannels with roughly around ∼110-μm and ∼200-μm width before and after LPD, respectively (∼200-ns and ∼1064-nm laser pulses are used in LPD); the second column: the transient ICCD images of plasma induced by a certain laser pulse during LPD at ∼100 ns after the pulse starts; the third column: the transient ICCD images of plasma induced by a certain laser pulse at ∼400 ns after the pulse starts

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Fig. 5

SEM images of a thin titanium workpiece plate. The workpiece has burrs generated from mechanical cutting as shown in (a). It is then treated by ultrasonic cleaning and the result is shown in (b). After this, it is treated by LPD and the result is shown in (c) (see Fig. 4 for LPD setup and the definition of Plane A and Plane B, and the XYZ coordinate system; laser pulse energy: around ∼0.5 mJ; total pulse number: ∼3600; pulse repetition rate: 25,000 Hz).

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Fig. 6

SEM images of Plane A of a thin titanium workpiece plate. The workpiece has burrs generated from mechanical cutting as shown in (a). It is then treated by ultrasonic cleaning and the result is shown in (b). After this, it is treated by LPD and the result is shown in (c) (see Fig. 4 for LPD setup and the definition of Plane A and Plane B, and the XYZ coordinate system; laser pulse energy: around ∼0.67 mJ; total pulse number: ∼2700; pulse repetition rate: 25,000 Hz).

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Fig. 4

Schematic diagram of the experimental setup for the results in Figs. 5 and 6, where workpieces with burrs generated from mechanical cutting are treated by LPD using sacrifice plates

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Fig. 3

Potential approaches of laser-induced plasma deburring using a sacrifice plate to generate plasma: (a) deburring from the sidewall of a through hole and (b) deburring from the sidewall of a microchannel

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