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Technical Brief

Ultrasonic Cavitation Peening of Stainless Steel and Nickel Alloy

[+] Author and Article Information
Benxin Wu

e-mail: bwu11@iit.edu

Ze Liu

Department of Mechanical,
Materials and Aerospace Engineering,
Illinois Institute of Technology,
10 W. 32nd Street,
Engineering 1 Building,
Chicago, IL 60616

Yun Zhou

Electro Scientific Industries, Inc.,
48660 Kato Road,
Fremont, CA 94538

Hongtao Ding

Department of Mechanical
and Industrial Engineering,
The University of Iowa,
Iowa City, IA 52242

1Corresponding author.

Manuscript received March 22, 2013; final manuscript received September 14, 2013; published online December 30, 2013. Assoc. Editor: Donggang Yao.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 136(1), 014502 (Dec 30, 2013) (6 pages) Paper No: MANU-13-1102; doi: 10.1115/1.4025756 History: Received March 22, 2013; Revised September 14, 2013

Ultrasonic cavitation peening is a peening process utilizing the high pressure induced by ultrasonic cavitation in liquids (typically water). In this paper, ultrasonic cavitation peening on stainless steel and nickel alloy has been studied. The workpiece surface microhardness, the microhardness variation at different depths, the workpiece surface profile, roughness, and morphology have been measured or observed. It has been found that for the studied situations, ultrasonic cavitation peening (at a sufficiently high horn vibration amplitude) can obviously enhance the workpiece surface hardness without significantly increasing the surface roughness. Under the investigated conditions, a surface layer of more than around 50 μm has been hardened under a horn vibration amplitude of ∼20 μm.

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References

Toh, C. K., 2007, “The Use of Ultrasonic Cavitation Peening to Improve Micro-Burr-Free Surfaces,” Int. J. Adv. Manuf. Technol., 31(7–8), pp. 688–693. [CrossRef]
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Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic diagram of the ultrasonic cavitation peening setup in this paper

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Fig. 2

Measured Vickers hardness of stainless steel samples after ultrasonic cavitation peening with different horn vibration amplitudes (ultrasound frequency: 20 KHz; processing time: 10 min)

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Fig. 3

Vickers hardness of nickel alloy samples after ultrasonic cavitation peening with different horn vibration amplitudes (ultrasound frequency: 20 KHz; processing time: 3 min)

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Fig. 4

SEM images of an untreated stainless steel 304 sample (left) and a treated sample (right) by ultrasonic cavitation peening (20 KHz for 10 min)

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Fig. 5

SEM images of an untreated nickel alloy 200 sample (left) and a treated sample (right) by ultrasonic cavitation peening (20 KHz for 3 min)

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Fig. 6

Surface profiles of untreated and treated stainless steel 304 samples by ultrasonic cavitation peening (20 KHz for 10 min)

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Fig. 7

Surface profiles of untreated and treated nickel alloy 200 samples by ultrasonic cavitation peening (20 KHz for 3 min)

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Fig. 8

Surface roughness (Ra) of stainless steel 304 samples after ultrasonic cavitation peening treatment under different horn vibration amplitudes (20 KHz for 10 min)

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Fig. 9

Surface roughness (Ra) of nickel alloy 200 samples after ultrasonic cavitation peening treatment under different horn vibration amplitudes (20 KHz for 3 min)

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Fig. 10

Vickers hardness at different depths below the top surface of stainless steel workpieces treated by ultrasonic cavitation peening (horn vibration amplitude: ∼20 μm, ultrasound frequency: 20 KHz, processing time: 10 min)

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Fig. 11

Vickers hardness at different depths below the top surface of nickel alloy workpieces treated by ultrasonic cavitation peening (horn vibration amplitude: ∼20 μm, ultrasound frequency: 20 KHz, processing time: 3 min)

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Fig. 12

SEM images of cross sections of a stainless steel sample and a nickel alloy sample treated by ultrasonic cavitation peening with the ultrasound frequency of 20 KHz and the horn vibration amplitude of ∼20 μm (processing time is 10 min and 3 min for the steel and nickel alloy samples, respectively; samples were mounted in bakelite during SEM observations)

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