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Research Papers

The Investigation of Plasma Produced by Intense Nanosecond Laser Ablation in Vacuum Under External Magnetic Field Using a Two-Stage Model

[+] Author and Article Information
Sha Tao

Advanced Optowave Corporation,
Ronkonkoma, NY 11779

Benxin Wu

Department of Mechanical, Materials,
and Aerospace Engineering,
Illinois Institute of Technology,
10 W. 32nd Street,
Engineering 1 Building, Room 207 A,
Chicago, IL 60616
e-mail: bwu11@iit.edu

Yun Zhou

Electro Scientific Industries, Inc.,
Fremont, CA 94538

Gary J. Cheng

School of Industrial Engineering,
Purdue University,
West Lafayette, IN 47906

1Corresponding author.

Manuscript received March 21, 2013; final manuscript received October 5, 2013; published online November 7, 2013. Assoc. Editor: Yung Shin.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 135(6), 061009 (Nov 07, 2013) (6 pages) Paper No: MANU-13-1098; doi: 10.1115/1.4025685 History: Received March 21, 2013; Revised October 05, 2013

In this paper a two-stage physics-based model has been applied to study the evolution of plasma produced by high-intensity nanosecond laser ablation in vacuum under external magnetic field. In the early stage (Stage I), the laser-induced plasma generation and its short-term evolution are described through one-dimensional (1D) hydrodynamic equations. An equation of state (EOS) that can cover the density and temperature range in the whole physical domain has been applied to supplement the hydrodynamic equations. In the later stage (Stage II), the plasma long-term evolution is simulated by solving 2D gas dynamic equations. The two-stage model can predict the spatial distributions and temporal evolutions of plasma temperature, density, velocity, and other parameters. The model is used to study and discuss the effects of external magnetic field on the plasma evolution. It provides a useful tool for related fundamental studies and practical applications.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

The schematic diagram of the two-stage model (sizes not drawn to scale)

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Fig. 2

Comparisons of (a) model-predicted plasma front locations with experimental measurements taken from Ref. [5], where the plasma is produced by ns laser ablation of an aluminum target in vacuum with or without a transverse magnetic field (in Ref. [5], laser pulse duration: 8 ns, laser wavelength: 1.06 μm, and intensity: 4 GW/cm2; magnetic field: B = ∼0.64 T), and (b) model-predicted electron number density at 1 mm from an aluminum target surface, with the experimentally measured electron density at 1 mm from an aluminum target surface taken from Ref. [5] (see Ref. [5] for experimental details and the measurement data error bar information).

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Model-predicted spatial distributions of plasma density at t = 90 ns with and without the transverse external magnetic field (the plasma is induced by ns laser ablation of an aluminum target in vacuum at 4 GW/cm2, and the density scale bars are the same for the two plots)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Model-predicted spatial distributions of plasma temperature at different times with and without the transverse external magnetic field (the plasma is induced by ns laser ablation of an aluminum target in vacuum at 4 GW/cm2)

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Fig. 5

Model-predicted vector plots for plasma velocity distributions at t = 90 ns with and without the transverse external magnetic field (the plasma is induced by ns laser ablation of an aluminum target in vacuum at 4 GW/cm2)

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