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Research Papers

Alternative Control of an Electrically Assisted Tensile Forming Process Using Current Modulation

[+] Author and Article Information
Joshua J. Jones

Koyo Bearings
Greenville, SC 29607

Laine Mears

Department of Automotive Engineering,
Clemson University,
Greenville, SC 29607

Manuscript received March 29, 2013; final manuscript received September 12, 2013; published online November 5, 2013. Assoc. Editor: Yung Shin.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 135(6), 061004 (Nov 05, 2013) (8 pages) Paper No: MANU-13-1116; doi: 10.1115/1.4025566 History: Received March 29, 2013; Revised September 12, 2013

Electrically assisted forming is a technique whereby metal is deformed while simultaneously undergoing electric current flow. Using this process, electric current level becomes a new degree of freedom for process control. In this work, we present some alternative control architectures allowing for new avenues of control using such a process. The primary findings are architectures to allow for forming at constant force and forming at constant stress levels by modulating electric current to directly control material strength. These are demonstrated in a tensile forming operation, and found to produce the desired results. Combining these control approaches with previous and contemporary efforts in modeling of the process physics will allow for system identification of material response properties and model-based control of difficult-to-observe process parameters such as real time temperature gradients.

Copyright © 2013 by ASME
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Figures

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Fig. 1

Block diagram for constant force forming

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Fig. 2

Block diagram for constant stress forming

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Fig. 3

Electrically assisted forming testing setup

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Fig. 4

Sensing schematic for process control

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Fig. 5

Constant force forming at various setpoints

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Fig. 6

Stress response for constant force forming

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Fig. 7

Filtered current application during constant force forming

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Fig. 8

Thermal response for constant force forming tests

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Fig. 9

Thermal profile for constant force forming test (1334 N)

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Fig. 10

Force response for constant stress forming

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Fig. 11

Stress response for constant stress forming

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Fig. 12

Filtered current application during constant stress forming

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Fig. 13

Constant stress forming specimen

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Fig. 14

Alternative architecture for model-based process control

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Fig. 15

Local strain predicted by EAF thermomechanical model

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Fig. 16

Stress–strain response predicted by EAF thermomechanical model versus experimental result

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Fig. 17

Thermal response predicted by EAF thermo-mechanical model

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Fig. 18

MPC block diagram for temperature control during EAF

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