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Research Papers

Extrusion Process Modeling for Aqueous-Based Ceramic Pastes—Part 2: Experimental Verification

[+] Author and Article Information
Mingyang Li

e-mail: ml89c@mst.edu

Lie Tang

e-mail: lietangmst@gmail.com

Robert G. Landers

e-mail: landersr@mst.edu

Ming C. Leu

e-mail: mleu@mst.edu
Department of Mechanical and
Aerospace Engineering,
Missouri University of Science and Technology,
Rolla, MO 65409

Manuscript received February 9, 2013; final manuscript received June 25, 2013; published online September 17, 2013. Assoc. Editor: Donggang Yao.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 135(5), 051009 (Sep 17, 2013) (7 pages) Paper No: MANU-13-1057; doi: 10.1115/1.4025015 History: Received February 09, 2013; Revised June 25, 2013

In the Part 1 paper, a constitutive law for the extrusion process of aqueous-based ceramic pastes was created. In the study described herein, a capillary rheometer was used to calibrate the viscosity of an alumina paste, and a single extruder system was used to conduct extrusion experiments to validate the constitutive model. It is shown that the extrusion response time and its change both depend on the amount of air in the extruder and the magnitude of the extrusion force. When the extrusion force is small, the rapid change of extrusion response time gives the extrusion dynamic an apparent quadratic response. When the extrusion force is large, the extrusion response time changes slowly, and is dominated by a first-order response. Air bubble release was observed in some of the experiments. A series of simulation and experimental studies were conducted to validate the predictive capabilities of the constitutive model for both steady-state and transient extrusion force behaviors. Good agreements between the simulation and experimental results were obtained. The experimental results demonstrate that the constitutive model is capable of capturing the characteristics of the highly nonlinear response at low extrusion forces and the air bubble release phenomenon. The numerical studies show that the decrease in the extrusion force during an air bubble release depends on the volume of the air bubble.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Capillary rheometer geometric model

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Fig. 2

Ram extruder geometric model

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Fig. 3

Capillary rheometer experimental system

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Fig. 4

Single ram extruder experimental system

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Fig. 5

Experimental pressure drop rate data and model for capillary rheometer system

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Fig. 6

Experimental extrusion force data and model for capillary rheometer system

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Fig. 7

Steady-state extrusion forces obtained analytically and experimentally on single extruder system

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Fig. 8

Experimental and simulation dynamic extrusion force responses with corresponding ram velocity for test conducted on capillary rheometer system

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Fig. 9

Experimental and simulation dynamic extrusion force responses and corresponding ram velocity for the test conducted on single extruder system

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Fig. 10

Simulated dynamic extrusion force responses with different initial values and corresponding ram velocity compared with experimental results obtained from capillary rheometer system

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Fig. 11

Time constant in capillary rheometer system as a function of extrusion force and ram velocity

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Fig. 12

Gain in capillary rheometer system as a function of extrusion force and ram velocity

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Fig. 13

An apparent quadratic response composed by a series of first-order responses with decreasing time constants

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Fig. 14

Extrusion force responses on capillary rheometer with different volumes of air bubble release

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Fig. 15

Extrusion force responses on single extruder system with an air bubble release

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