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Research Papers

Friction Self-Piercing Riveting of Aluminum Alloy AA6061-T6 to Magnesium Alloy AZ31B

[+] Author and Article Information
YongBing Li

Associate Professor
State Key Laboratory of Mechanical
System and Vibration
Shanghai Key Laboratory of Digital
Manufacture for Thin-walled Structures,
School of Mechanical Engineering,
Shanghai Jiao Tong University,
Shanghai 200240, China
e-mail: yongbinglee@sjtu.edu.cn

YaTing Li

Shanghai Key Laboratory of Digital
Manufacture for Thin-walled Structures,
School of Mechanical Engineering,
Shanghai Jiao Tong University,
Shanghai 200240, China

Manuscript received April 24, 2013; final manuscript received September 2, 2013; published online November 5, 2013. Assoc. Editor: Yung Shin.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 135(6), 061007 (Nov 05, 2013) (7 pages) Paper No: MANU-13-1180; doi: 10.1115/1.4025421 History: Received April 24, 2013; Revised September 02, 2013

Implementation of lightweight low-ductility materials such as aluminum alloys, magnesium alloys and composite materials has become urgently needed for automotive manufacturers to improve the competitiveness of their products. However, hybrid use of these materials poses big challenges to traditional joining process. Self-piercing riveting (SPR) is currently the most popular technique for joining dissimilar materials and has been widely used in joining all-aluminum and multimaterial vehicle bodies. However, in riveting magnesium alloys, cracks always occur for its low ductility. In this paper, a hybrid joining process named friction self-piercing riveting (F-SPR), which combines mechanical joining mechanism of SPR with solid-state joining mechanism of friction stir spot welding (FSSW) by making rivet rotating at high speed in riveting process, was proposed aiming at joining the low-ductility materials. The effectiveness of the F-SPR process was validated via riveting 1 mm thick AA6061-T6 and 2 mm thick AZ31B. The results showed that the F-SPR process could significantly improve the rivetability of magnesium alloys, and greatly increase the joint strength, comparing with the traditional SPR process.

Copyright © 2013 by ASME
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References

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic diagram of friction self-piercing riveting process. (a) Rivet feed stage; (b) hot riveting stage; (c) in situ friction stage; and (d) off stage.

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Fig. 2

F-SPR prototype system. (a) Overview; and (b) riveting configuration.

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Fig. 3

Rivet configuration and its dimensions

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Fig. 4

Die configuration and its dimensions

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Fig. 5

Bottom surfaces and cross sections of the joints under different rotational speed. (a) 900 r/min, (b) 1450 r/min, and (c) 2000 r/min. Rivet feed rate is 1.35 mm/s and dwell time is 0 s.

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Fig. 6

Bottom surfaces and cross section of the nugget under different rivet feed rate of (a) and (a′) 6.0 mm/s; (b) and (b′) 10.0 mm/s. Rotational speed is 1450 r/min and dwell time is 0 s.

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Fig. 7

Bottom surface and cross section of the joint with two-stage F-SPR process. Rotational speed is 1450 r/min and dwell time is 0 s.

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Fig. 8

Locations to be observed for IMC formation.

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Fig. 9

IMC observed at specified locations. (a) Location A; (b) location B; (c) location C; (d) location D; and (e) location E. Dwell time is 0 s.

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Fig. 10

Line scanning of the IMC layer around location C. Dwell time is 0 s.

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Fig. 11

IMC observed at specified locations. (a) Location A; (b) location B; (c) location C; (d) location D; and (e) location E. Dwell time is 5 s.

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Fig. 12

Line scanning crossing the interfaces. (a) Location A; (b) location B, and (c) location C. Dwell time is 5 s.

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Fig. 13

Schematic view of tensile-shear testing (mm)

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Fig. 14

Macromorphology of SPR joint: (a) Bottom surface and (b) cross section

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Fig. 15

Tensile-shear testing curves. (a) F-SPR and (b) SPR.

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Fig. 16

Failure modes of different joining process. (a) F-SPR joint and (b) SPR joint.

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