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Research Papers

Continuous Dry Cylindrical and Rectangular Deep Drawing by Electroconductive Ceramic Dies

[+] Author and Article Information
Kenji Tamaoki

Tokyo Metropolitan Industrial Technology Research Institute,
2-4-10, Aomi,
Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-0064, Japan
e-mail: tamaoki.kenji@iri-tokyo.jp

Ken-ichi Manabe

Tokyo Metropolitan University,
1-1 Minami-Osawa,
Hachioji-shi, Tokyo 192-0397, Japan

Seiji Kataoka

Shonan Institute of Technology,
1-1-25, Nisikaigan, Tujido,
Fujisawa-shi, Kanagawa 251-8511, Japan

Tatsuhiko Aizawa

Shibaura Institute of Technology,
3-9-14, Shibaura,
Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8548, Japan

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Manufacturing Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the Journal of Manufacturing Science and Engineering. Manuscript received May 3, 2012; final manuscript received February 5, 2013; published online May 24, 2013. Assoc. Editor: Brad L. Kinsey.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 135(3), 031010 (May 24, 2013) (7 pages) Paper No: MANU-12-1137; doi: 10.1115/1.4023720 History: Received May 03, 2012; Revised February 05, 2013

Two types of electroconductive ceramic tools are employed in this study to describe the dry deep drawing behavior of cold rolled steel sheets into cylindrical and rectangular cups. Each of electroconductive ceramic tools is machined by die sinking electric discharge. Four experimental setups are also prepared to investigate the effect of the surface roughness on the quality of dry deep drawing: the unlapped and the lapped electroconductive ceramic dies in dry condition and the unlubricated and the lubricated SKD11 die. Even without lubricating oils, cylindrical and rectangular cups are successfully deep drawn over 10,000 by the present tooling. Furthermore, compared to the lubricated SKD11 tooling, surface roughness of deep drawn cups is reduced by the present ceramic tooling. Fine finishing in ceramic tooling never leads to low surface roughness in the deep drawn cups since the work materials make unconstrained plastic flow in the direction of thickness. Hence, the unlapped electroconductive ceramic tooling is favored for practical ceramic tooling to preserve well-defined contact interface between metallic work sheets and ceramic tools in dry deep drawing. In addition, the rectangular cup drawing is evaluated by more severe conditions than the cylindrical cup drawing because the stress concentrates on the corner parts. Through this test, it is demonstrated that the electroconductive ceramic tooling has a potential of practical dry deep drawing.

Copyright © 2013 by ASME
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References

Figures

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Fig. 4

Micrographs of the work material surface (SPCC) (a) for cylindrical cup drawing and (b) for rectangular cup drawing

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Fig. 3

Outlook of electroconductive ceramic tooling for rectangular cup drawing: (a) punch (SKD11), (b) die, and (c) blank holder

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Fig. 2

Outlook of electroconductive ceramic tooling for cylindrical cup drawing: (a) punch (SKD11), (b) die, and (c) blank holder

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Fig. 1

Schematic figure of the ceramic tooling

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Fig. 5

Surface roughness of dry cylindrical drawn cups by the ZrO2-WC die before lapping

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Fig. 6

Photographs of the ZrO2-WC die before and after using deep drawing test: (a) before deep drawing test and (b) after deep drawing test

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Fig. 7

SEM micrographs after EDM for finish machining: (a) SEM micrograph × 1000 and (b) SEM micrograph × 10,000

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Fig. 8

Surface roughness of dry cylindrical drawn cups by the lapped ZrO2-WC die

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Fig. 9

Surface roughness of cylindrical drawn cups by the lubricated SKD11 die

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Fig. 15

Surface roughness of dry rectangular drawn cups by the lubricated SKD11 die

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Fig. 16

Photograph and micrograph of the first rectangular drawn cups

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Fig. 17

Micrographs at the corner of the rectangular drawn cups: initial and final

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Fig. 10

Photograph and micrograph of the first cylindrical drawn cups: (a) ZrO2-WC die before lapping, (b) lapped ZrO2-WC die, and (c) lubricated SKD11 die

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Fig. 11

Photographs of blank and rectangular drawn cup

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Fig. 14

Surface roughness of dry rectangular drawn cups by the SKD11 die without lubricant

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Fig. 12

Surface roughness of dry rectangular drawn cups by the ZrO2-WC die before lapping

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Fig. 13

Surface roughness of dry rectangular drawn cups by the lapped ZrO2-WC die

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