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Research Papers

The Influence of Cryogenic Coolants in Machining of Ti–6Al–4V

[+] Author and Article Information
B. Dilip Jerold

Research Scholar

M. Pradeep Kumar

Associate Professor
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
CEG Campus,
Anna University Chennai,
Chennai 600 025, India

Contributed by the Manufacturing Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the Journal of Manufacturing Science and Engineering. Manuscript received March 8, 2011; final manuscript received November 10, 2012; published online May 24, 2013. Assoc. Editor: Patrick Kwon.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 135(3), 031005 (May 24, 2013) (8 pages) Paper No: MANU-11-1266; doi: 10.1115/1.4024058 History: Received March 08, 2011; Revised November 10, 2012

Machining of titanium alloy Ti–6Al–4V is a challenging task because of the greatly increased cutting temperature that results in short tool life. Numerous attempts have been made in the past by employing various cutting fluids for machining purpose, including liquid nitrogen (LN2) as the cryogenic coolant. This study deals with the influence of cryogenic coolants, especially LN2 and carbon dioxide (CO2), in machining of Ti–6Al–4V and its effects on cutting temperature, cutting forces, surface roughness, chip morphology, and tool wear. The results obtained in cryogenic machining are compared with that of dry and wet machining. Cutting temperature was reduced to an extent of 36% and 47% in cryogenic CO2 machining and cryogenic LN2 machining in comparison with wet machining. The application of CO2 produced reduced cutting forces up to 24% and improved surface finish up to 48% compared to cryogenic LN2 machining. It also produced better chip control and minimized tool wear than dry, wet, and LN2 machining.

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References

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Figures

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Fig. 5

Comparison of surface roughness values at different cutting velocities: (a) 41 m/min; (b) 94 m/min; and (c) 145 m/min

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Fig. 4

Comparison of main cutting force in different machining environments with varying feed rates at different velocities: (a) 41 m/min; (b) 94 m/min; and (c) 145 m/min

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Fig. 3

Variation of cutting temperature under different machining environments: (a) 41 m/min; (b) 94 m/min; and (c) 145 m/min

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Fig. 2

Schematic view of cryogenic LN2 machining setup

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Fig. 1

Schematic view of cryogenic CO2 machining setup

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Fig. 6

SEM views of the worn-out inserts (crater wear) after machining for 5 minutes under dry, wet, and cryogenic cooling conditions at different cutting velocities: (a) 41 m/min; (b) 94 m/min; and (c) 145 m/min

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Fig. 7

SEM views of the worn-out inserts (flank wear) after machining for 5 minutes under dry, wet, and cryogenic cooling conditions at different cutting velocities: (a) 41 m/min; (b) 94 m/min; and (c) 145 m/min

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