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Research Papers

Study on the Reduction Strategy of Machining-Induced Edge Chipping Based on Finite Element Analysis of In-Process Workpiece Structure

[+] Author and Article Information
Hu Gong

e-mail: gonghu2012@gmail.com

F. Z. Fang

e-mail: fzfang@gmail.com
State Key Laboratory of Precision Measuring
Technology & Instruments,
Centre of MicroNano Manufacturing Technology,
Tianjin University,
Tianjin 300072, PRC

X. F. Zhang

School of Mechanical Engineering,
Tianjin University,
Tianjin 300072, PRC

X. T. Hu

State Key Laboratory of Precision
Measuring Technology & Instruments,
Centre of MicroNano Manufacturing Technology,
Tianjin University,
Tianjin 300072, PRC

Contributed by the Manufacturing Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the Journal of Manufacturing Science and Engineering. Manuscript received December 25, 2011; final manuscript received January 11, 2013; published online January 29, 2013. Assoc. Editor: Burak Ozdoganlar.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 135(1), 011017 (Jan 29, 2013) (10 pages) Paper No: MANU-11-1413; doi: 10.1115/1.4023458 History: Received December 25, 2011; Revised January 11, 2013

Edge chipping is one of the most serious issues during machining process of brittle materials. To find an effective method to reduce edge chipping, the relationship between the distribution of maximum principal stress and edge chipping is studied comprehensively based on 3D finite element analysis (FEA) model of in-process workpiece structure in this paper. Three-level influencing factors of edge chipping are proposed, which are helpful to understand the relationship between intuitive machining parameters and edge chipping at different levels. Based on the analysis, several experiments are designed and conducted for drilling and slotting to study the strategy of controlling edge chipping. Two methods are adopted: (a) adding additional support, (b) improving tool path. The result show that edge chipping can be reduced effectively by optimizing the distribution of the maximum principal stress during the machining process. Further, adding addtitional support method is extended to more complex parts and also obtain a good result. Finally, how to use adding additional support method, especially for complex parts, will be discussed in detail. Several open questions are raised for future research.

Copyright © 2013 by ASME
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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Edge chippings during slotting

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Fig. 2

Edge chipping observed under Keyence VHX-200 microscope

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Fig. 3

Boundary conditions

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Fig. 4

Relationship between maximum principal stress and D

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Fig. 5

The positions with maximum principal stress

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Fig. 7

Exit edge chipping during drilling hole in K9 glass workpiece

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Fig. 8

Boundary conditions

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Fig. 9

Locations with maximum principal stress during drilling through hole near exit

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Fig. 10

Three-level influencing factors of edge chipping

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Fig. 11

Improved tool path for reducing edge chipping at exit

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Fig. 12

Maximum principal stress when the cutting tool is close to the exit for improved tool path

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Fig. 13

The difference between the original tool path and the improved tool path

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Fig. 14

Fix additional support using sealing wax

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Fig. 15

Constraints for the FEA model with additional support

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Fig. 16

Relationship between maximum principal stress and drilling depth H

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Fig. 17

Exit edge chipping for drilling hole with additional support

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Fig. 18

Control edge chipping for drilling several through holes (nucleated glass)

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Fig. 19

Control edge chipping for milling complex part (sapphire) with thin wall structure

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Fig. 20

Edge chipping for machining K9 glass complex parts

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