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Research Papers

Computational Modeling of the Effects of Viscous Dissipation on Polymer Melt Flow Behavior During Injection Molding Process in Plane Channels

[+] Author and Article Information
M. Tutar

Mechanical and Manufacturing Department,
MGEP Mondragon Goi Eskola Politeknikoa,
Loramendi 4 Apartado 23,
20500 Mondragon, Spain;
IKERBASQUE,
Basque Foundation for Science,
48011 Bilbao, Spain
e-mail: mtutar@mondragon.edu

A. Karakus

Mechanical Engineering Department,
Middle East Technical University,
06531 Ankara, Turkey

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Manufacturing Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF MANUFACTURING SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING. Manuscript received September 12, 2011; final manuscript received November 8, 2012; published online January 22, 2013. Assoc. Editor: Allen Y. Yi.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 135(1), 011007 (Jan 22, 2013) (16 pages) Paper No: MANU-11-1299; doi: 10.1115/1.4023239 History: Received September 12, 2011; Revised November 08, 2012

The present finite volume method based fluid flow solutions investigate the boundary-layer flow and heat transfer characteristics of polymer melt flow in a rectangular plane channel in the presence of the effect of viscous dissipation and heat transfer by considering the viscosity and density variations in the flow. For different inflow velocity boundary conditions and the injection polymer melt temperatures, the viscous dissipation effects on the velocity and temperature distributions are studied extensively to analyze the degree of interactions of thermal flow field dominated by the viscous heating and momentum diffusion mechanism with varying boundary conditions. The modified forms of Cross constitutive equation and Tait equation of state are adopted for the representation of viscosity variations and density change, respectively, in the polymer melt flow. These models together with the viscous dissipation terms are successfully incorporated into the finite volume method based fluid flow solutions to realistically represent the heat effects in the plane channel. The numerical results presented for two different commercial polymer melt flows, namely, polymer Polyacetal POM-M90-44 and polypropylene (PP), demonstrate that proposed mathematical formulations for viscosity and density variations including viscous heating terms into the energy equations, which are fully coupled with momentum equations, lead to more accurate representation of the fluid flow and heat transfer phenomena for the polymer melt flows in plane channels.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

2D geometry model of the plane channel used for the present study

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Fig. 2

The representation of local mesh distribution in the flow entry zone for the principal mesh configuration of 4000 × 200 mesh cells with stretching factor of 1.2

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Fig. 3

Comparison of analytical and numerical solutions for three different mesh resolutions (injection polymer melt temperature of 493 K and inflow velocity of 3 cm/s at the gap thickness of 4 mm)

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Fig. 4

Viscosity variation of the polymers POM-M90-44 and PP with respect to shear rate at different reference temperatures at atmospheric pressure

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Fig. 5

The averaged velocity and temperature flow field contours in the flow entry domain (0≤x/h≤5) for U0 = 3 cm/s, T0= 423 K at h = 4 mm; (a) temperature field; (b) velocity field. The figures on the left and right represent the contours for POM-M90-44 and PP, respectively.

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Fig. 6

The local distributions of Prandtl and Peclet numbers in the flow entry domain (0≤x/h≤5) for U0 = 3 cm/s, T0= 423 K at h = 4 mm; (a) local Prandtl number distribution; (b) local Peclet number distribution. The figures on the left and right represent the contours for POM-M90-44 and PP, respectively.

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Fig. 7

The evolution of centerline velocity, Uc and temperature rise (Tc-T0) at the channel centerline for POM-M90-44 and PP for U0=3 cm/s, T0= 423 K at h = 4 mm

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Fig. 8

The velocity and temperature profiles of POM-M90-44 polymer at x/h = 1 for U0=3 cm/s, T0= 423 K and h = 4 mm with and without compressibility assumption; (a) the velocity profile; (b) the temperature profile

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Fig. 9

The evolution of centerline velocity, Uc and temperature rise (Tc-T0) at the channel centerline for POM-M90-44 for T0= 423, 473, 523 K and U0 =  1, 3, 5 cm/s at h = 4 mm; (a) U0 = 1 cm/s; (b) U0 = 3 cm/s; (c) U0 = 5 cm/s

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Fig. 10

The evolution of centerline velocity and temperature rise (Tc-T0) at the channel centerline for PP polymer for T0= 423, 473, 523 K and U0 =  1, 3, 5 cm/s at h = 4 mm; (a) U0 = 1 cm/s; (b) U0 = 3 cm/s; (c) U0 = 5 cm/s

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Fig. 11

The velocity profiles with varying injection melt temperatures at x/h = 1 for U0 = 3 cm/s and h = 4 mm; (a) POM-M90-44; (b) PP

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Fig. 12

The profile of temperature rise with varying injection melt temperatures at x/h = 12.5 for U0 = 3 cm/s and h = 4 mm; (a) POM-M90-44; (b) PP

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Fig. 13

The profile of temperature rise with varying injection melt temperatures at different cross sections for POM-M90-44 for U0 = 3 cm/s and h = 4 mm; (a) T0= 423 K; (b) T0= 473 K; (c) T0= 523 K

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Fig. 14

The profile of temperature rise with varying injection melt temperatures at different cross sections for PP for U0 = 3 cm/s and h = 4 mm; (a) T0= 423 K; (b) T0= 473 K; (c) T0= 523 K

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Fig. 15

The evolution of centerline temperature rise (Tc-T0) at different inflow velocities for injection polymer melt temperature of 473 K at the gap thickness of 4 mm; (a) POM-M90-44; (b) PP

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Fig. 16

The profile of temperature rise with varying inflow velocities at different cross sections for POM-M90-44 for T0= 423 and 523 K at h = 4 mm; (a) T0= 423 K at x/h = 12.5; (b) T0= 423 K at x/h = 500; (c) T0= 523 K at x/h = 12.5; (d) T0= 523 K at x/h = 500

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Fig. 17

The profile of temperature rise with varying inflow velocities at different cross sections for PP for T0= 423 and 523 K at h = 4 mm; (a) T0= 423 K at x/h = 12.5; (b) T0= 423 K at x/h = 500; (c) T0= 523 K at x/h = 12.5; (d) T0= 523 K at x/h = 500

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Fig. 18

The profile of temperature rise with varying gap thicknesses at different cross sections for POM-M90-44 for injection polymer melt flow temperature of 473 K, and U0 = 3 cm/s; (a) x/h = 2.5; (b) x/h = 500

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