0
Research Papers

Laser Light Transmission Through Thermoplastics as a Function of Thickness and Laser Incidence Angle: Experimental and Modeling

[+] Author and Article Information
Elizabeth Azhikannickal

e-mail: azhikae@gmail.com

Philip J. Bates

e-mail: bates-p@rmc.ca
Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering,
Royal Military College of Canada,
P.O. Box 17000, Station Forces,
Kingston, ON, K7K 7B4, Canada

Gene Zak

Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering,
Queen's University,
McLaughlin Hall,
Kingston, ON, K7L 3N6, Canada
e-mail: zak@me.queensu.ca

Contributed by the Manufacturing Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF MANUFACTURING SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING. Manuscript received January 9, 2011; final manuscript received August 12, 2012; published online November 12, 2012. Assoc. Editor: Yong Huang.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 134(6), 061007 (Nov 12, 2012) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4007619 History: Received January 09, 2011; Revised August 12, 2012

It is important to accurately measure and predict the laser light transmission through unreinforced and reinforced thermoplastics if candidate materials are to be assessed for laser transmission welding (LTW) applications. This paper presents the results of laser transmission measurements through unreinforced polyamide 6 (PA6) and 10% glass fiber reinforced polycarbonate of various thicknesses and corresponding to various laser incidence angles (angle between the incident laser beam and the normal to the transparent part). A novel transmission measurement method, developed by the authors, was employed. A model, utilizing the Fresnel specular surface reflection conditions as well as accounting for refraction, absorption and reflection of the laser light through the bulk material, was used to predict transmission as a function of thickness and laser incidence angle. Results of transmission tests on both materials showed that, for a given thickness, the transmission decreases as the laser angle of incidence increases. In addition, at any given laser incidence angle, the transmission decreases as the thickness increases. The advantage of the model is that it requires only one experimentally determined constant for a given material. Good agreement existed between the experimentally measured transmission and the model prediction for the range of thicknesses and laser incidence angles studied.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2012 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Reflection, absorption and transmission of light through a semicrystalline, glass fiber reinforced thermoplastic

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Section view of fixture for transmission measurements of thermoplastic samples at zero and nonzero laser incidence angles

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Effect of laser angle of incidence on predicted and measured transmission through PA6 of thickness 1.5 mm (error bars on experimental data points indicate ±2 standard deviations)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Effect of laser angle of incidence on predicted and measured transmission through PA6 of thickness 2.3 mm (error bars on experimental data points indicate ±2 standard deviations)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Effect of laser angle of incidence on predicted and measured transmission through PA6 of thickness 3.2 mm (error bars on experimental data points indicate ±2 standard deviations)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

Effect of laser angle of incidence on predicted and measured transmission through 10% glass fiber reinforced polycarbonate of thickness 1.5 mm (error bars on experimental data points indicate ±2 standard deviations)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Effect of laser angle of incidence on predicted and measured transmission through 10% glass fiber reinforced polycarbonate of thickness 3.2 mm (error bars on experimental data points indicate ±2 standard deviations)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

Model predictions of the effect of laser angle of incidence on transmission through PA6 of various thicknesses

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

Schematic presenting the framework for the prediction of light transmission through a thermoplastic and corresponding to a nonzero laser incidence angle

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In