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Research Papers

Three-Dimensional Simulation of Cross-Flow Microfilter Fouling in Tortuous Pore Profiles With Semisynthetic Metalworking Fluids

[+] Author and Article Information
Shiv G. Kapoor

e-mail: sgkapoor@illinois.edu

Richard E. DeVor

Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering,
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign,
Urbana, IL 61801

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Manufacturing Engineering Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF MANUFACTURING SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING. Manuscript received August 19, 2010; final manuscript received August 8, 2012; published online November 1, 2012. Assoc. Editor: Patrick Kwon.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 134(6), 061002 (Nov 01, 2012) (11 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4007618 History: Received August 19, 2010; Revised August 08, 2012

Fouling mechanisms and models for flux decline are investigated with a three-dimensional simulation of the tortuous, verisimilar geometry of an α-alumina microfilter. Reconstruction of the three-dimensional geometry was accomplished from two-dimensional cross-sectional cuts. A wall collision model and a particle trapping model are developed for the investigation of fouling mechanisms. The reconstructed geometry and the two models were used in computational fluid dynamics to simulate metalworking colloidal particles travelling through and becoming trapped in the tortuous pore paths of a microfilter. Results reveal sharp flux decline initiating from partial pore blocking and subdued flux decline transitioning to cake layer development with steady-state flow. This flow behavior is in agreement with experimental data from earlier studies. The inclusion of the wall collision model and particle trapping model enabled the revelation of cake layer development as a fouling mechanism. Additional simulations of microfilters at different particle size distributions were conducted and discussed.

Copyright © 2012 by ASME
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References

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Microfilter support and pore membrane

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Fig. 2

Alumina microfilter prepared by hammer impact (a) and FIB (b)

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Fig. 3

Successive membrane slices

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Fig. 4

(a)–(d) Layer images and similar geometric features extant amongst each (colored rectangles)

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Fig. 5

Comparison of a layer recreated with spheres (a) and image from the FIB (b)

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Fig. 6

(a) One layer and (b) three layers of spherical structure. Units in μm.

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Fig. 7

Isometric views of the three-dimensional mesh

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Fig. 8

Depiction of triangular face (a) and face centroid (b) on this tetragonal cell. Face normal depicted with n∧.

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Fig. 9

Specular reflection for particles

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Fig. 10

Flow velocity profile and particle trajectory from the velocity inlet to the pressure outlet

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Fig. 11

Schematic of the penetration depth with the bulk flow region and the pore region

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Fig. 12

Two trapped particles (light) in a tortuous membrane (dark)

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Fig. 13

Volumetric flux decreases with number of particles

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Fig. 14

Isometric/top view of the trapped particles (light) and the membrane (dark)

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Fig. 15

Relationship between penetration depth and injected number of particles

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Fig. 16

SEM images of a clean microfilter (a) and a developed cake layer (b), [10]

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Fig. 17

Flux decline for semi-used MWF

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Fig. 18

Flux decline for new MWF

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Fig. 19

Isometric/top view of the trapped particles (light) and the membrane (dark) in a semi-used MWF

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Fig. 20

Isometric/top view of the trapped particles (light) and the membrane (dark) in new MWF

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Fig. 21

Penetration depth profile for semi-used MWF

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Fig. 22

Penetration depth profile for new MWF

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