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Research Papers

On the Volumetric Assessment of Tool Wear in Machining Inserts With Complex Geometries—Part II: Experimental Investigation and Validation on Ti-6Al-4V

[+] Author and Article Information
Mathew A. Kuttolamadom, M. Laine Mears, Thomas R. Kurfess

Uli Burger

International Center for Automotive Research (CU-ICAR),   Clemson University, Greenville, SC 29607burger@clemson.edu

April Bryan

 Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of the West Indies, St. Augustine, Trinidad and Tobagoaprilbr@gmail.com

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 134(5), 051003 (Aug 28, 2012) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4007294 History: Received August 18, 2011; Revised June 08, 2012; Published August 27, 2012; Online August 28, 2012

In part 1, traditional methods of tool wear characterization were qualitatively assessed, and consequently a volumetric approach of wear quantification was developed, standardized, and evaluated using a gauge R&R study. The objective of this paper is to experimentally investigate and validate this assessment methodology using the wear results from a series of controlled machining experiments on grade-5 titanium alloy. The traditionally difficult-to-machine alloy, Ti-6Al-4V, was specifically chosen as the work material in order to highlight how the use of this assessment methodology is necessitated especially because of (i) the pronounced complexities in the geometric profiles of typical cutting tools employed for machining Ti-6Al-4V and (ii) its nonconformity in behavior with standard tool wear models, such as the Taylor’s tool life model and its extensions. This assessment methodology is then validated through the simultaneous analysis and comparison of traditional flank wear and associated photomicrographs with volumetric wear and its evolution. Furthermore, the concept of the M-ratio and its derivatives are developed to quantify the efficiency of the cutting tool during each pass at a constant material removal rate (MRR).

Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Iscar milling insert with relevant dimensions [41]

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Figure 2

(a) Insert with BUE and (b) with BUE removed

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Figure 3

Unworn (new) insert: (a) Microscope captured image and (b) solid model along with reference surface

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Figure 4

Insert matching alternative: (a) New and worn surface matching and (b) solid model with reference surface

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Figure 5

Insert after a cutting length of 154.8 mm: (a) Microscope image and (b) solid model used for comparison

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Figure 6

Insert after a cutting length of 309.6 mm: (a) Microscope image and (b) solid model used for comparison

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Figure 7

Insert after a cutting length of 464.4 mm: (a) Microscope image and (b) solid model used for comparison

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Figure 8

Average volumetric wear plotted against varying feeds and speeds for setups 1–3

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Figure 9

Direct correlation of MRR with VTW

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Figure 10

Average measured flank wear (four inserts each)

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Figure 11

Normalized average VTW (four inserts each)

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Figure 12

Flank land of L1 insert at end of step-1 (154.8 mm)

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Figure 13

Flank land of L1 insert at end of step-2 (316.8 mm)

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Figure 14

Flank land of L1 insert at end of step-3 (464.4 mm)

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Figure 15

Workpiece surface roughness values of DOE

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Figure 16

Evolving flank wear (a) new and (b)–(f) after pass 1–5

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Figure 17

Flank wear at the end of each pass

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Figure 18

M-ratio at the end of each pass (pass 5—failed)

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Figure 19

Cutting torque during each pass

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Figure 20

Cumulative work done by the cutting insert

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Figure 21

M-ratio against cut length for prior 22 DOE

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