0
Research Papers

Experimental Study on Vibration-Assisted Grinding

[+] Author and Article Information
Kuan-Ming Li1

Department of Mechanical Engineering,  National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan

Yang-Ming Hu

Department of Mechanical and Electro-mechanical Engineering,  National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung 80824, Taiwan

Zhong-Yi Yang, Ming-Yuan Chen

Micro/Meso Mechanical Manufacturing R&D Department, Metal Industries Research & Development Centre (MIRDC), Kaohsiung 81160, Taiwan

1

Corresponding author.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 134(4), 041009 (Jul 18, 2012) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4007102 History: Received January 30, 2012; Revised May 27, 2012; Accepted June 05, 2012; Published July 18, 2012; Online July 18, 2012

This paper presents experimental studies of vibration-assisted grinding with small-amplitude vibration (in the order of 1 μm) in terms of ground surface finish and tool life. The objectives are to obtain finer surface finishes on molds and longer tool life. The investigation shows that vibration-assisted grinding can improve surface finishes when compared with conventional grinding. Two different vibration frequencies are conducted in the experiments. Results show that surface finish and tool life are influenced by different process parameters. In vibration-assisted grinding, the best surface finish is obtained by using higher frequency of 11.4 kHz and lower feed rates. In this study, vibration-assisted grinding can extend tool life more than twice as that in conventional grinding. It is also shown that tool life in vibration-assisted grinding can be significantly improved by using minimum quantity lubrication (MQL).

Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Tool path for face grinding experiments

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Surface roughness for different feeds in conventional grinding and vibration-assisted grinding

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Photograph of the ground surface: (a) conventional grinding; (b) vibration-assisted grinding

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Photograph of the ground surface: (a) conventional grinding; (b) vibration-assisted grinding (feed = 5.76 μm/rev, frequency = 11.4 kHz and amplitude = 0.90 μm)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Profile of the ground surfaces in Fig. 2: (a) conventional grinding with feed = 3.84 μm/rev (very few scratches); (b) conventional grinding with feed = 5.76 μm/rev (a few scratches); (c) vibration-assisted grinding with feed = 3.84 μm/rev (a few scratches); (d) vibration-assisted grinding with feed = 5.76 μm/rev

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Surface roughness for different spindle speeds in conventional grinding and vibration-assisted grinding

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Surface roughness for different cross feeds in conventional grinding and vibration-assisted grinding

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

Surface roughness for different workpiece vibration amplitudes at a frequency of 9 kHz

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

Photograph of the ground surface (feed = 5.76 μm/rev, frequency = 9 kHz, and amplitude = 1.3 μm)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

Surface roughness for different workpiece vibration frequencies

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 11

Tool life comparison between conventional grinding and vibration-assisted grinding (spindle speed = 25,000 rpm)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 12

Photograph of the tool end face in conventional grinding: (a) new tool; (b) worn tool (spindle speed = 25,000 rpm)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 13

Photograph of the tool end face in vibration-assisted grinding: (a) new tool; (b) worn tool (spindle speed = 25,000 rpm)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 14

Tool life comparison between conventional grinding and vibration-assisted grinding (spindle speed = 35,000 rpm)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 15

Photograph of the ground surface: (a) conventional grinding; (b) vibration-assisted grinding

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 16

Tool life comparison among conventional grinding, vibration-assisted grinding, and the combination of VAG and MQL (VAG + MQL)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 17

Photograph of the tool end face in vibration-assisted grinding with MQL: (a) before the grinding test; (b) after the grinding test

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In