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Research Papers

Modified Primary Shear Zone Analysis for Identification of Material Mechanical Behavior During Machining Process Using Genetic Algorithm

[+] Author and Article Information
L. Pang

Machining Research Laboratory, Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science,  University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Oshawa, ON, L1H 7K4, Canadalei.pang@uoit.ca

H. A. Kishawy

Machining Research Laboratory, Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science,  University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Oshawa, ON, L1H 7K4, CanadaHossam.Kishawy@uoit.ca

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 134(4), 041003 (Jul 18, 2012) (11 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4006768 History: Received June 16, 2010; Revised April 10, 2012; Published July 18, 2012; Online July 18, 2012

In the current work, an inverse analysis on the primary shear zone was introduced to determine the five constants in Johnson–Cook’s material constitutive equation under the conditions of metal cutting. Based on the detailed analysis on the boundary conditions of the velocity and shear strain rate fields, Oxley’s “equidistant parallel-sided” shear zone model was revisited. A more realistic nonlinear shear strain rate distribution has been proposed under the frame of nonequidistant primary shear zone configuration, so that all the boundary conditions can be satisfied. Based on the presented analysis, the shear strain, shear strain rate and temperature at the main shear plane were calculated. In conjugation with the measured cutting forces and chip thickness, a genetic algorithm (GA) based optimization program has been developed for the system identification. In order to verify the effectiveness of the developed algorithm, the obtained material constants were used in a forward analytical simulation. The acceptable agreement with experimental data validates the proposed method.

Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 8

Chromosome strings arrangement

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Figure 9

Demonstration of multipoint mutation

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Figure 10

Flow chart of identification of JC parameters using genetic algorithm

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Figure 11

Error of the best result for each generation

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Figure 12

Comparison of shear angle with the data used for system identification

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Figure 13

Comparison of cutting forces with the data used for system identification

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Figure 14

Comparison of thrust forces with the data used for system identification

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Figure 4

Primary shear zone proportion

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Figure 5

Shear strain rate distribution through the primary shear zone

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Figure 6

Tangential velocity distribution through the primary shear zone

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Figure 7

Shear strain distribution through the primary shear zone

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Figure 15

Comparison of cutting forces using GA determined JC parameters with the experimental data from Ref. [19]

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Figure 16

Comparison of thrust forces using GA determined JC parameters with the experimental data from Ref. [19]

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Figure 1

Orthogonal metal cutting model with thick deformation zone [8]

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Figure 2

Simplified nonequidistant primary shear zone

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Figure 3

Demonstration of the distribution of tangential velocity and shear strain rate in the primary shear zone

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