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Research Papers

Experimental Evaluation of the Variable-Feedrate Intelligent Segmentation Method for High-Speed, High-Precision Micromilling

[+] Author and Article Information
Angela A. Sodemann

Manufacturing Research Center, The George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 813 Ferst Drive Northwest, Atlanta, GA 30332

J. Rhett Mayor

Manufacturing Research Center, The George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 813 Ferst Drive Northwest, Atlanta, GA 30332rhett.mayor@me.gatech.edu

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 133(2), 021001 (Mar 07, 2011) (12 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4003010 History: Received November 13, 2009; Revised October 28, 2010; Published March 07, 2011; Online March 07, 2011

This study will present an experimental evaluation of the variable-feedrate intelligent segmentation (VFIS) method described by Mayor and Sodemann (2008, “Intelligent Tool-Path Segmentation for Improved Stability and Reduced Machining Time in Micromilling,” ASME J. Manuf. Sci. Eng., 130(3), p. 031121). The apparatus for the tests will be identified and the approach to the testing procedure will be laid out, including the means of evaluation of the method. A detailed explanation is then given for the choice of process parameters. This is followed by the introduction of the β parameter as an additional factor in the VFIS implementation. Results are presented from cutting tests. The first set of test results presented is from a complete set of evaluation tests performed on sine wave geometries. The second set is an evaluation of the fan and airfoil shapes used previously in the numerical simulations of the VFIS method. It is found that the VFIS method is able to successfully constrain geometric error to within specified bounds in most cases. The cutting time for the VFIS method shows as much as 53% reduction relative to the nonuniform rational B-spline-based trajectory generation method.

Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Photographs of the low-cost/precision ration micromilling machine employed in the validation of trajectory generation methods

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Figure 2

Example sine wave geometry with the generated tool path for a 100 μm tool

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Figure 3

Algorithm error definition as applied to sine geometry cutting tests

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Figure 4

Flow chart of the metrology approach applied to the sinusoidal VFIS and EVF-NURBS evaluation tests

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Figure 5

(a) Feedrate profiles and (b) feedrate limit ratios for the numerical evaluation parameters applied to the example sine wave

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Figure 6

(a) Feedrate profiles and (b) feedrate limit ratios for the experimental evaluation parameters applied to the example sine wave

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Figure 7

Stitched image of a sinusoidal geometry cut using (a) the EVF-NURBS method and (b) the VFIS method

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Figure 15

Algorithm error in the fan shape for (a) EVF-NURBS interpolation and (b) VFIS interpolation and in the airfoil shape for (c) EVF-NURBS interpolation and (d) VFIS interpolation

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Figure 9

Magnified view of a portion of the sinusoidal tool path trajectories as generated by the (a) EVF-NURBS and (b) VFIS segmentation methods

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Figure 10

Algorithm error for (a) the EVF-NURBS method and (b) the VFIS method for a characteristic trial of the sine geometry test

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Figure 11

Comparison of the extracted image with the target geometry for the characteristic trial for (a) EVF-NURBS and (b) VFIS

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Figure 12

Total error in the final cut sine geometry for (a) the EVF-NURBS case and (b) the VFIS case

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Figure 13

VFIS percent time benefit versus Λ ratio for all sine tests performed

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Figure 14

Fan shape trajectory generation algorithm output from (a) EVF-NURBS and (b) VFIS superimposed on the target tool path and airfoil shape trajectory generation algorithm output from (c) EVF-NURBS and (d) VFIS superimposed on the target tool path

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Figure 8

Comparison of algorithm-generated tool path and target tool path for a characteristic trial using (a) the EVF-NURBS method and (b) the VFIS method

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Figure 16

Feedrate profiles for (a) the fan shape and (b) the airfoil shape neglecting acceleration limitations

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Figure 17

Image of the point of minimum radius of the curvature for (a) EVF-NURBS interpolation and (b) VFIS interpolation

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Figure 18

Interferometer scan of the point of highest curvature for the fan shape made using (a) EVF-NURBS and (b) VFIS

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