0
Research Papers

Optical Effects of Surface Finish by Ultraprecision Single Point Diamond Machining

[+] Author and Article Information
Lei Li

Department of Industrial, Welding and Systems Engineering, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210

Stuart A. Collins

Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Electro Science Laboratory, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210

Allen Y. Yi1

Department of Industrial, Welding and Systems Engineering, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210yi.71@osu.edu

1

Corresponding author.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng. 132(2), 021002 (Mar 26, 2010) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4001037 History: Received May 22, 2009; Revised January 13, 2010; Published March 26, 2010; Online March 26, 2010

The single point diamond turning process has been used extensively for direct optical surface fabrication. However, the diamond machined surfaces have characteristic periodic tool marks, which contribute to reduced optical performance such as scattering and distortion. In this paper, studies of the characteristics of diamond machined surface and scattering from the diamond machined surfaces are presented. Four different parameters, the first order optical diffraction, the zero order reflection, the surface roughness, and the residual tool mark depth, are used as indicators for the machined surface quality. Four sets of tests are presented showing the relationship between machined surface quality and machining conditions such as spindle speed, feedrate, and machining process. Finally, an empirical model is given based on the measurements.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Components of a diamond machined surface: (a) profile of a typical diamond machined surface, (b) periodic tool marks, (c) comparison of the measured tool marks with the predicted tool marks (the first four period of Fig. 1), and (d) other surface roughness components

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Plot of sensor current versus angle for the diamond machined surface in Fig. 1 showing the specular reflection, higher order diffraction peaks, and sideband diffraction

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Nanotech 350FG freeform generator and the axis arrangement

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Detailed drawing showing measurement apparatus

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Comparison of typical Veeco profilometer and optical scattering measurements: (a) 3D plot showing typical surface profile measured by profilometer, (b) calculated surface profile spectrum in x direction based on the Veeco measurement, (c) directly measured optical scattering in x direction for the same sample, and (d) comparison of the peak-background ratio of the Veeco profilometer and direct optical scattering measurements

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Experimental results of diamond turning tests, including all the samples of VST_1, VST_2, and the turning samples of STSC and BC: (a) normalized first order diffraction intensity, (b) normalized specular reflectivity, (c) theoretical and measured tool mark depths versus tool mark spacing, and (d) surface roughness measured by Veeco profilometer

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Experimental results of CST tests: (a) normalized first order diffraction intensity, (b) normalized specular reflectivity, (c) measured and theoretical tool mark depths versus feedrate and spindle speed, and (d) surface roughness

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

Experimental results of the STSC tests (a) normalized first order diffraction intensity, (b) normalized specular reflectivity, (c) measured and theoretical tool mark depths versus tool mark spacing, and (d) surface roughness

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

Experimental results of BC tests (a) normalized first order diffraction, (b) normalized specular reflectivity, (c) measured and theoretical tool mark depths versus tool mark spacing, and (d) surface roughness

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

Models for the relationship between tool marks caused diffraction and tool mark spacing

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In