0
Research Papers

Prediction of Minimum Bending Ratio of Aluminum Sheets From Tensile Material Properties

[+] Author and Article Information
C. Iacono1

 Materials Innovation Institute (M2i), P.O. Box 5008, 2600 GA Delft, The Netherlandsc.iacono@m2i.nl

J. Sinke

Faculty of Aerospace Engineering, Delft University of Technology, P.O. Box 5058, 2600 GB Delft, The Netherlandsj.sinke@tudelft.nl

R. Benedictus

Faculty of Aerospace Engineering, Delft University of Technology, P.O. Box 5058, 2600 GB Delft, The Netherlandsr.benedictus@tudelft.nl

1

Corresponding author.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 132(2), 021001 (Mar 26, 2010) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4000960 History: Received February 05, 2009; Revised December 14, 2009; Published March 26, 2010; Online March 26, 2010

One of the most widely involved operations in sheet metal forming processes in aircraft industry is bending, particularly, air bending as a simple process. For this reason, the bendability of aluminum alloys is an important material property, which determines the minimum radius to which a sheet may be bent without cracking. Hence, the challenging issue, on which this paper focuses, is to predict this material parameter from other material parameters commonly measured during standard tensile tests. For this prediction, a finite element model and a response surface model are elaborated and, as a result, a relatively simple formula is proposed to calculate the minimum bending radius from the reduction in the area at fracture, the strain hardening exponent, and the yield stress, which are material parameters available from tensile tests.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Schematic representation of air bending process. Between brackets the dimensions of the die used in the experimental tests reported in the paper.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

True strain at the outer surface of the sheet versus bending ratio according to the bending theory represented by Eqs. 16,17

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Experimental stress-strain curves for the three materials M1–M3

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Example of true strain contour (in the horizontal direction) and mesh density (material M1 and punch radius rp=3 mm)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

εo versus rp/t0 curves according to the bending theory represented by Eq. 17 and the finite element models for the three examined materials

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Comparison of deformed shapes between materials M1 and M2, resulting from the same punch with radius rp=1 mm

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

εo versus r/t0 curves according to the bending theory represented by Eq. 17 and the finite element models for the three examined materials

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

Fiber radii along the sheet thickness during bending

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

εo versus r/t0 curves according to the bending theory represented by Eqs. 16,17,19 and the finite element model for material M1

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

Schematization of specimen cross section after failure during uniaxial tensile tests

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 11

εo versus r/t0 curves according to the bending theory represented by Eq. 17, the finite element model, and the response surface model represented by Eq. 20 for material M1

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 12

εo versus r/t0 curves according to the bending theory represented by Eq. 17, the finite element model, and the response surface model represented by Eq. 20 for material M2

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 13

εo versus r/t0 curves according to the bending theory represented by Eq. 17, the finite element model, and the response surface model represented by Eq. 20 for material M3

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In