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Research Papers

Development Process for Custom Three-Dimensional Printing (3DP) Material Systems

[+] Author and Article Information
Ben R. Utela

Department of Mechanical Bioengineering, University of Washington, Box 355061, 1705 NE Pacific Street, Seattle, WA 98195butela@u.washington.eduDepartment of Mechanical Engineering, University of Washington, Stevens Way, Box 352600, Seattle, WA 98195butela@u.washington.edu

Duane Storti

Department of Mechanical Bioengineering, University of Washington, Box 355061, 1705 NE Pacific Street, Seattle, WA 98195storti@u.washington.eduDepartment of Mechanical Engineering, University of Washington, Stevens Way, Box 352600, Seattle, WA 98195storti@u.washington.edu

Rhonda L. Anderson

 U.S. Navy—Naval Surface Warfare Center, Panama City Division (NSWC-PCD), 110 Vernon Avenue, Panama City, FL 32407rhonda.anderson@navy.mil

Mark Ganter

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Washington, Stevens Way, Box 352600, Seattle, WA 98195ganter@u.washington.edu

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 132(1), 011008 (Jan 07, 2010) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4000713 History: Received October 20, 2008; Revised November 16, 2009; Published January 07, 2010; Online January 07, 2010

The development of a new material system for three-dimensional printing (3DP) can be difficult without experience in the field, since the flexibility of the 3DP process implies a large number of material and processing parameters. This paper presents a detailed explanation of the steps involved in developing specific implementations of 3DP, along with tools and insight for each step. This material system development procedure should provide a clear understanding of the 3DP process steps and development decisions to help the user take advantage of the considerable flexibility of 3DP and expedite a new system development. The paper concludes with a demonstration of how the guidance provided is applied in the development of fully dense ceramic dental copings; a research problem uniquely suited to the flexibility of 3DP.

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Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 3

Ink formulation processing steps

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Figure 4

Material system testing and printing

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Figure 1

Identification of material system constraints and postprocessing options based on final part characteristics

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Figure 2

Powder formulation processing steps

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