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Research Papers

Taguchi Method Based Process Space for Optimal Surface Topography by Finish Hard Milling

[+] Author and Article Information
Song Zhang1

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487

Y. B. Guo2

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487yguo@eng.ua.edu

1

Currently a visiting scholar from Shandong University, China.

2

Corresponding author.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 131(5), 051003 (Sep 04, 2009) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3207740 History: Received January 30, 2009; Revised July 21, 2009; Published September 04, 2009

Hard milling has a potential to replace finish grinding in manufacturing dies and molds. Surface finish is one key surface integrity parameter to justify the use of hard milling. In this study, a Taguchi design-of-experiment based finish milling hardened AISI H13 tool steel (50±1HRc) with physical vapor deposition (PVD) (Ti, Al) N–TiN-coated end mill was conducted to investigate the optimal surface topography and roughness. A kinematic model of the cutting tool loci was developed to investigate the formation mechanism of the surface texture and correlate the simulated surface textures with the measured ones. The milled 3D surface topography and anisotropic roughness in the feed and step-over directions were thoroughly characterized and analyzed. The milled surface roughness Ra of less than 0.1μm in the feed direction and 0.15μm in the step-over direction has shown that hard milling is capable of replacing grinding as a finish or semifinish process. Furthermore, the process parameter spaces for the desired surface properties were indentified via the surface contour maps.

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Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Cycloidal cutting loci in milling: (a) cycloidal cutting loci in one pass and (b) overlapping cutting loci in consecutive passes

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Figure 2

Schematic transitional and stable surface texture zones in milling

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Figure 3

Milled surface textures at different cutting conditions

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Figure 4

Surface topography by milling (ae=1.0 mm, ap=0.4 mm, v=100 m/min, and fz=0.2 mm/tooth)

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Figure 5

Texture profiles of the milled surface (ae=1.0 mm, ap=0.4 mm, v=100 m/min, and fz=0.2 mm/tooth): (a) feed direction and (b) step-over direction

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Figure 6

Surface profiles of the milled surface (ae=1.0 mm, ap=0.4 mm, v=100 m/min, and fz=0.2 mm/tooth): (a) feed direction and (b) step-over direction

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Figure 7

Average, maximum, and minimum surface roughness (Ra) in the feed and step-over directions

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Figure 8

Surface roughness map under the combined influence of feed rate and radial depth-of-cut: (a) feed direction and (b) step-over direction

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Figure 9

Skewness map under the combined influence of feed rate and radial depth-of-cut: (a) feed direction and (b) step-over direction

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Figure 10

Kurtosis map under the combined influence of feed rate and radial depth-of-cut: (a) feed direction and (b) step-over direction

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