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Research Papers

Physics-Based Predictive Cutting Force Model in Ultrasonic-Vibration-Assisted Grinding for Titanium Drilling

[+] Author and Article Information
Na Qin

School of Mechanical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, Liaoning 116024, China; Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506

Z. J. Pei1

Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506zpei@ksu.edu

C. Treadwell

 Sonic-Mill, 7500 Bluewater Road Northwest, Albuquerque, NM 87102

D. M. Guo

School of Mechanical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, Liaoning 116024, China

1

Corresponding author.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 131(4), 041011 (Jul 14, 2009) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3159050 History: Received January 09, 2009; Revised April 23, 2009; Published July 14, 2009

Ultrasonic-vibration-assisted grinding (UVAG) or rotary ultrasonic machining has been investigated both experimentally and theoretically. Effects of input variables on output variables in UVAG of brittle materials and titanium (Ti) have been studied experimentally. Models to predict the material removal rate in UVAG of brittle materials have been developed. However, there is no report on models of cutting force in UVAG. This paper presents a physics-based predictive model of cutting force in the UVAG of Ti. Using the model developed, influences of input variables on cutting force are predicted. These predicted influences are compared with those determined experimentally. This model can serve as a useful template and foundation for development of cutting force models in UVAG of other materials (such as ceramics and stainless steels) and models to predict torque, cutting temperature, tool wear, and surface roughness in UVAG.

Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Illustration of UVAG (after Ref. 19)

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Figure 2

Relation between project area B and penetration depth δ

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Figure 3

Calculation of effective contact time Δt

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Figure 5

Two coordinate systems for deriving DGSE

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Figure 6

Relation between intersection volume W and penetration depth δ

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Figure 7

Relation between diamond grain number and cutting force

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Figure 8

Influence of diamond grain number

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Figure 9

Relation between diamond grain radius and cutting force

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Figure 10

Influence of diamond grain radius

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Figure 11

Change in DGSE shape as the diamond grain radius changes

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Figure 12

Relation between vibration amplitude and cutting force

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Figure 13

Influence of vibration amplitude

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Figure 14

Change in DGSE shape as the vibration amplitude changes

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Figure 15

Relation between vibration frequency and cutting force

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Figure 16

Influence of vibration frequency

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Figure 17

Change in DGSE shape as the vibration frequency changes

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Figure 18

Relation between spindle speed and cutting force

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Figure 19

Influence of spindle speed

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Figure 20

Change in DGSE shape as the spindle speed changes

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Figure 21

Relation between feedrate and cutting force

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Figure 22

Influence of feedrate

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Figure 23

Experimental relation between diamond concentration and cutting force (after Ref. 17)

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Figure 24

Experimental relation between diamond grain size and cutting force (after Ref. 17)

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Figure 25

Experimental relation between ultrasonic power and cutting force (after Ref. 16)

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Figure 26

Experimental relation between spindle speed and cutting force (after Ref. 16)

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Figure 27

Experimental relation between feedrate and cutting force (after Ref. 16)

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