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Research Papers

Effect of Carbon Nanotube (CNT) Loading on the Thermomechanical Properties and the Machinability of CNT-Reinforced Polymer Composites

[+] Author and Article Information
J. Samuel, R. E. DeVor, S. G. Kapoor, K. J. Hsia

Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801

A. Dikshit1

Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801

1

Currently working as Production Engineer, Schlumberger, Houston, TX.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 131(3), 031008 (May 05, 2009) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3123337 History: Received July 18, 2008; Revised February 18, 2009; Published May 05, 2009

The machinability of carbon nanotube (CNT)-reinforced polymer composites is studied as a function of CNT loading, in light of the trends seen in their material properties. To this end, the thermomechanical properties of the CNT composites with different loadings of CNTs are characterized. Micro-endmilling experiments are also conducted on all the materials under investigation. Chip morphology, burr width, surface roughness, and cutting forces are used as the machinability measures to compare the composites. For composites with lower loadings of CNTs (1.75% by weight), the visco-elastic/plastic deformation of the polymer-phase plays a significant role during machining, whereas, at loadings 5% by weight, the CNT distribution and interface effects dictate the machining response of the composite. The ductile-to-brittle transition that occurs with an increase in CNT loading results in reduced minimum chip thickness values and burr dimensions in the CNT composite. The increase in thermal conductivity with the increase in CNT loading results in reduced number of adiabatic shear bands being observed on the chips and reduced thermal softening effects at high cutting velocities. Thus, overall, an increase in CNT loading appears to improve the machinability of the composite.

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Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

TEM image of Composite A(7)

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Figure 2

Storage modulus versus temperature

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Figure 3

Heat flow versus temperature

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Figure 4

Compressive stress-strain curve at strain rate of 5000/s

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Figure 5

Tension stress-strain curve at strain rate of 0.001/s

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Figure 6

Characteristic chips seen at a cutting velocity of 80 m/min (scale bar=100 μm)

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Figure 10

Representative burrs: scale bar=200 μm (cutting velocity=80 m/min; FPT=3 μm)

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Figure 11

Burr width versus feed-per-tooth

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Figure 12

Surface roughness versus feed-per-tooth

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Figure 13

Cutting force versus feed-per-tooth

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Figure 9

Close up of chips: scale bar=20 μm (cutting velocity=80 m/min; FPT=3 μm)

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Figure 8

Characteristic chips seen at a cutting velocity of 130 m/min (scale bar=100 μm)

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Figure 7

Ploughed surfaces of Composite A and Composite B

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