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Research Papers

Preferential Media for Abrasive Flow Machining

[+] Author and Article Information
Kamal K. Kar1

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Advanced Nanoengineering Materials Laboratory, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Uttar Pradesh, Kanpur 208016, India; Advanced Nanoengineering Materials Laboratory, Materials Science Programme, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Uttar Pradesh, Kanpur 208016, Indiakamalkk@iitk.ac.in

N. L. Ravikumar, Piyushkumar B. Tailor, J. Ramkumar

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Advanced Nanoengineering Materials Laboratory, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Uttar Pradesh, Kanpur 208016, India

D. Sathiyamoorthy

Powder Metallurgy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085, India

1

Corresponding author.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 131(1), 011009 (Jan 15, 2009) (11 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3046135 History: Received September 29, 2007; Revised November 07, 2008; Published January 15, 2009

The abrasive flow machining (AFM) is used to deburr, radius, polish and remove recast layer of components in a wide range of applications. Material is removed from the workpiece by a flowing semisolid mass across the surface to be finished. In this study a medium for AFM has been developed from the various viscoelastic carriers and has been contrasted through experimental investigation. The viscoelastic media are selected on the basis of existing media through the studies of thermogravimetric analysis and are characterized by mechanical, as well as rheological, properties with the help of a universal testing machine and a rheometer. The performance of the medium is evaluated through the finishing criteria on a two-way AFM setup. The investigation reveals that the styrene butadiene rubber (SBR) medium gives a good improvement in surface finish. The surface improvement through SBR media is 88%. It is also found that the strain, temperature, shear rate, time of applied constant stress, cyclic loading, etc. have an impact on the mechanical and rheological properties of the newly developed medium, which are ultimately governed by the performance of the medium in the target applications.

Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Chemical structure of natural rubber

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Figure 2

Chemical structure of ethylene propylene diene monomer rubber

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Figure 3

Chemical structure of butyl rubber

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Figure 4

Chemical structure of silicone rubber

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Figure 5

Chemical structure of styrene butadiene rubber

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Figure 6

Diagram of laboratory fabricated AFM setup

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Figure 7

Effect of temperature on derivative weight loss of various carriers (NR: natural rubber, EPDM: ethylene propylene diene monomer rubber, IIR: butyl rubber, Si: silicone rubber, SBR: styrene butadiene rubber; PBS: polyborosilixane (commercial media))

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Figure 8

Effect of number of cycles on improvement in Ra using various media for the aluminum workpiece

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Figure 9

Effect of number of cycles on improvement in Ra using various media for the En8 workpiece

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Figure 10

Stress-strain behavior of various virgin carriers at a temperature of 25°C and strain rate of 0.189 s−1 under tensile and compression modes

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Figure 11

Effect of strain on modulus of various virgin carriers at a temperature of 25°C and strain rate of 0.189 s−1 under tensile mode

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Figure 12

Effect of strain on modulus of various media at a temperature of 25°C and strain rate of 0.189 s−1 under tensile mode

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Figure 13

Effect of temperature on modulus of various media at 25% strain and strain rate of 0.189 s−1 under tensile mode

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Figure 14

Effect of strain on tear modulus of various media at a temperature of 55°C and strain rate of 0.189 s−1 under tear mode

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Figure 15

Effect of temperature on tear modulus of various media at 25% strain and strain rate of 0.189 s−1 under tear mode

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Figure 16

Effect of strain and temperature on ΔW for various media under compression mode

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Figure 17

Effect of shear rate on viscosity of SBR media at 27°C

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Figure 18

Reduction in average Ra of aluminum specimen with respect to the number of cycles for 78% SiC, 14% SBR, and 8% process oil at 6.2 MPa

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Figure 19

Surface topography of aluminum specimen (a) before finishing and (b) after 100 cycles

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Figure 20

Effect of time on creep compliance for 78% SiC loaded SBR media at 27°C

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Figure 21

Effect of frequency on complex viscosity for 78% SiC loaded SBR media at 27°C

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