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Research Papers

A Cutting Rate Model for Reciprocating Sawing

[+] Author and Article Information
Joseph P. Domblesky1

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI 53233

Thomas P. James

 Techtronic Industries Ltd., Tsuen Wan, New Territories, Hong Kong

G. E. Otto Widera

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI 53233

1

Corresponding author.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 130(5), 051015 (Sep 11, 2008) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2976143 History: Received October 18, 2007; Revised June 24, 2008; Published September 11, 2008

In the present paper, the reciprocating sawing process is analyzed, and a model for linear cutting rate is developed. The resulting model is based on an orthogonal approximation of cutting at individual teeth and accounts for elastic and plastic indentation. Cutting rates obtained from an instrumented sawing fixture show good agreement with predicted results for the range of conditions considered. Cutting rate was found to be proportional to thrust force and reciprocating rate though this behavior is influenced by edge radius and flow stress at higher levels. While it was not possible to decouple the effect of pitch and blade set, it was confirmed that coarser pitch blades do provide higher cutting rates.

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Copyright © 2008 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Typical reciprocating saw with key features indicated

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Figure 2

Depiction of cutting edge wear geometry observed on (a) set teeth and (b) raker teeth for metal cutting blades

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Figure 3

Depiction of the contact area between an individual cutting edge and the workpiece surface

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Figure 4

Comparison of the predicted cutting rate envelope generated from the specified flow stress and edge radii tolerances and experimental cutting rates used in the model validation

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Figure 5

Predicted envelope and experimental cutting rates as a function of reciprocating rate for an applied 31.1 N thrust force

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Figure 6

Subsurface distortion of the AISI 1018 steel workpiece after reciprocating sawing for applied thrust forces of (a) 22.24 N, (b) 44.48 N, and (c) 88.96 N; shown at 400× magnification

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Figure 7

Comparison of experimental cutting rates and predicted envelope as a function of thrust force for a reciprocating rate of 1700 spm and a 14 tpi blade pitch

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Figure 8

Comparison of experimental cutting rates and predicted envelope obtained using different blade pitches for a reciprocating rate of 1700 spm and 44.5 N thrust force

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