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Research Papers

Tool Feasibility Analysis for Fixture Assembly Planning

[+] Author and Article Information
Xiumei Kang

Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Manitoba, 15 Gillson Street, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 5V6, Canadaumkangx@cc.umanitoba.ca

Qingjin Peng1

Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Manitoba, 15 Gillson Street, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 5V6, Canadapengq@cc.umanitoba.ca

1

Corresponding author.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 130(4), 041010 (Jul 15, 2008) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2952819 History: Received May 25, 2007; Revised January 21, 2008; Published July 15, 2008

Tool feasibility is a critical issue for generating a complete fixture assembly plan to reduce production setup time. Previous fixture design systems rarely consider the assembly tool feasibility. Current methods of assembly tool feasibility analysis mainly depend on simulation-based or user-interactive approaches, which rely on users’ judgment. This paper presents a new approach to tool feasibility analysis for fixture assembly planning. The fixture workspace around a tool is represented by a newly defined global accessibility sphere with depth of a truncated half-line. The assembly tools are modeled as five articulated parts to fully describe the tool characteristics. Tool feasibility analysis is executed to verify assembly tools’ feasibility applied on a fastener. In particular, both tool motion and tool placement constraints during tool applications are integrated into the tool geometric reasoning. The example demonstrates the fast computing speed and intuitive simulation of several assembly tools applied in fixture assembly.

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Copyright © 2008 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

The architecture of fixture assembly planning

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Figure 2

Two kinds of assembly tools: (a) FAT and (b) TAT

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Figure 3

Assembly tool modeling (a) tool abstract model. (b) xy-plane view. (c) xz-plane view.

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Figure 4

Formation of the GAC(R)d: (a) the coordinate system of GAC(R)d centered at a tool joint, (b) Object A and part of B, which are inside the R sphere, are included in the construction of GAC(R)d, and (c) 2D accessibility map of GAC(R)d

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Figure 5

Pseudocode for computing GAC(R)d

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Figure 6

Feasibility analysis of the tool handle

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Figure 7

Illustration of the tool handle’s calculation

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Figure 8

Feasibility analysis of the tool end

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Figure 9

Feasibility analysis of the tool body

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Figure 10

Feasibility analysis of the tool head

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Figure 11

Feasibility analysis of the tool extension

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Figure 14

Tool feasibility test results of several assembly tools: (a) a wrench with a socket, (b) a power wrench, (c) an open-end wrench, and (d) a speeder with an extension and a deep socket

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Figure 13

Assembly tool feasibility test window: (a) tool feasibility test window and (b) tool parameters and 2D accessibility map of GAC(R)d

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Figure 12

Overall process of the tool feasibility analysis

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