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Technical Briefs

Nondestructive Testing of Ultrasonic Welding Joints Using Shearography Technique

[+] Author and Article Information
Shuhai Jia1

NSF Engineering Research Center for Reconfigurable Manufacturing Systems, Department of Mechanical Engineering,College of Engineering,  University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2125;Shjia@mail.xjtu.edu.cnSchool of Mechanical Engineering,  Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, Shanxi 710049, ChinaShjia@mail.xjtu.edu.cn

En Hong

NSF Engineering Research Center for Reconfigurable Manufacturing Systems, Department of Mechanical Engineering,College of Engineering,  University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2125

Reuven Katz

NSF Engineering Research Center for Reconfigurable Manufacturing Systems, Department of Mechanical Engineering,College of Engineering,  University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2125;Mechanical Engineering Department,  Technion Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 3200, Israel

Leonid C. Lev, Susan Smyth, Jeffrey Abell

 GM R&D Center, 30500 Mound Road, Warren, MI 48090

1

Corresponding author.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 134(3), 034502 (May 07, 2012) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4006550 History: Received January 17, 2011; Revised February 10, 2012; Published May 04, 2012; Online May 07, 2012

Ultrasonic welding is a rapidly developing field. It is an industrial technique whereby high-frequency ultrasonic acoustic vibrations are locally applied to workpieces being pressed together to create a solid-state weld. A big advantage of ultrasonic welding is its efficiency of joining dissimilar thin metal sheets or foils used in battery, aerospace, and auto industry. The invention of more sophisticated and inexpensive equipment and increased demand have led to a growing knowledge of the fundamental process. However, many aspects of ultrasonic welding still require additional studies, such as better relating weld quality to process parameters. Inspecting the quality of the ultrasonic welding joints in-line also poses new challenges. Currently, destructive tensile test is one of the most effective ways to inspect the joint quality in laboratory, but it cannot be applied for in-line inspection. In this paper, the feasibility of using shearography technique for inspecting ultrasonic weld quality has been studied. A new shearography system with submillimeter resolution was designed, built, and tested. An extensive experimental study of ultrasonic welding nondestructive testing (NDT) was performed. The experimental results show that the effective welded area could be extracted from the shearography phase map. This paper shows that shearography is a potential technology for the NDT of ultrasonic welding.

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Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Scheme of shearography system

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Figure 2

Photograph of shearography system built

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Figure 3

Results of system validation test. (a) Original phase map, (b) phase map after median filter and histogram equalization, (c) result of local histogram phase filter, and (d) phase map of 3 mm deformation.

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Figure 4

Ultrasonic welding samples of GM Motor

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Figure 5

Measurement results of the ultrasonic welding sample 1. (a) Check using paper, (b) result of heavy thermal loading, and (c) result of light thermal loading.

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Figure 6

Measurement results of the ultrasonic welding sample-8. (a) Check using paper, (b) result of heavy thermal loading, and (c) result of light thermal loading.

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Figure 7

Results of FEM analysis. (a) FEM model, (b) FEM result at 40 °C, and (c) center-line profile.

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