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Research Papers

The Influence of Friction Stir Welding Process Idealization on Residual Stress and Distortion Predictions for Future Airframe Assembly Simulations

[+] Author and Article Information
R. W. McCune, M. Price, J. Butterfield

 School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Queen’s University Belfast, Ashby Building, Belfast BT9 5AH, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom

A. Murphy1

 School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Queen’s University Belfast, Ashby Building, Belfast BT9 5AH, Northern Ireland, United Kingdoma.murphy@qub.ac.uk

1

Corresponding author.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 134(3), 031011 (May 16, 2012) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4006554 History: Received June 08, 2011; Revised March 27, 2012; Published May 16, 2012; Online May 16, 2012

The ability to accurately predict residual stresses and resultant distortions is a key product from process assembly simulations. Assembly processes necessarily consider large structural components potentially making simulations computationally expensive. The objective herein is to develop greater understanding of the influence of friction stir welding process idealization on the prediction of residual stress and distortion and thus determine the minimum required modeling fidelity for future airframe assembly simulations. The combined computational and experimental results highlight the importance of accurately representing the welding forging force and process speed. In addition, the results emphasize that increased CPU simulation times are associated with representing the tool torque, while there is potentially only local increase in prediction fidelity.

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Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

A typical fuselage stiffened panel assembly

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Figure 2

Schematic of friction stir welding process

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Figure 3

Schematic of future airframe manufacturing philosophy

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Figure 4

Validation component plus refined FE mesh

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Figure 5

Time history of torque and forging force before and during welding process

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Figure 6

Simulation and experimentally measured temperature history

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Figure 7

Validation component tool surface out-of-plane distortions—lateral planes

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Figure 8

Validation component tool surface out-of-plane distortions—longitudinal planes

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Figure 9

Predicted and measured longitudinal residual stress

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Figure 10

Dominant process modeling effects

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Figure 11

Interaction of modeling effects

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Figure 12

Longitudinal residual stresses with and without torque

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