0
Research Papers

The Effects of Cutting Speed and Depth of Cut on Machinability Characteristics of Austempered Ductile Iron

[+] Author and Article Information
Ahmet Akdemir

Department of Mechanical Engineering,Faculty of Engineering-Architecture,  Selcuk University, Konya, Turkey 42075aakdemir@selcuk.edu.tr

Şakir Yazman

Mechanical Department,  Ilgın Technical Science College of Selcuk University, Konya, Turkey 42075syazman@selcuk.edu.tr

Hacı Saglam

Mechanical Department,  Technical Science College of Selcuk University, Kampus 42031, Konya, Turkeyhsaglam@selcuk.edu.tr

Mesut Uyaner1

Department of Metallurgy and Material Engineering,Faculty of Engineering-Architecture,  Selcuk University, Konya, Turkey 42075muyaner@selcuk.edu.tr

1

Corresponding author.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 134(2), 021013 (Apr 04, 2012) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4005805 History: Received April 06, 2011; Revised November 02, 2011; Published March 30, 2012; Online April 04, 2012

Ductile iron can acquire enhanced thermal and mechanical properties from austempering heat treatment. The present study aims to identify the function of different cutting parameters affecting machinability and to quantify its effects. Turning was performed to test machinability according to the ISO3685-1993 (E) standard. After austenitizing at 900 °C for 90 min, austempered ductile iron (ADI) specimens were quenched in a salt bath at 380 °C for 90 min. The cutting force signals along three directions were measured in real time, whereas flank wear and surface roughness were measured offline. For the cutting parameters, the cutting speed and depth of cut were varied, but the feed rate was kept constant. In the flank wear tests, machining length was corresponded to tool life. In addition, in order to find out the effect of cutting parameters on surface roughness (Ra ), tangential force (Ft ), and flank wear (VB) during turning, response surface methodology (RSM) was utilized by using experimental data. The effect of the depth of cut on the surface roughness was negligible but considerable in the cutting forces. The increased cutting speed produced a positive effect on surface roughness. It is found that the cutting speed was the dominant factor on the surface roughness, tangential force, and flank wear.

Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Isothermal transformation (IT) diagram for DI [23]

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Relative machinability of several ferrous materials [7]

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Schematic diagram of the heat treatment process

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Typical profile of flank wear [13]

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

The schematic working principle of QSD

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

(a) Micrographs of an as-cast specimen and (b) austempered ductile iron

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

The variation of cutting forces with cutting speed (a = 1 mm)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

The variation of cutting forces with depth of cut (v = 200 m/min)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

Flank wear rate at different machining lengths (a = 1 mm, v = 250 m/min)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

The effect of cutting speed on surface roughness (a = 1 mm)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 11

The effect of depth of cut on surface roughness (v = 100 m/min)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 12

Flank wear rate dependence at different machining lengths on cutting speed (a = 1 mm)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 13

Flank wear rate dependence at different machining lengths on depth of cut (v = 100 m/min)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 14

Micrographs showing the morphologies of chip roots at various cutting speeds [28]

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 15

Response surface of (a) surface roughness (Ra ), (b) tangential force (Ft ), and (c) flank wear (VB)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 16

Response optimization plot for (a) surface roughness (Ra ), (b) tangential force (Ft ), and (c) flank wear (VB) parameter components

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In