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Research Papers

Mathematical Modeling and Implementation of Residual Stress Mapping From Microscale to Macroscale Finite Element Models

[+] Author and Article Information
S. M. Afazov1

Department of Mechanical, Materials and Manufacturing Engineering,  University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD, UKshukri.afazov@nottingham.ac.uk

A. A. Becker, T. H. Hyde

Department of Mechanical, Materials and Manufacturing Engineering,  University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD, UK

1

Corresponding author.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 134(2), 021001 (Apr 04, 2012) (11 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4006090 History: Received September 07, 2009; Revised January 26, 2012; Published March 30, 2012; Online April 04, 2012

The paper reviews a development of mathematical algorithms and implementation of mapping residual stress profiles from microscale to macroscale finite element (FE) models. A shot-peening simulation of Inconel 718 is conducted using the finite element method (FEM) to obtain the residual stress profiles which are used as an input in the developed mapping algorithms. Residual stress profiles induced by the shot-peening processes are mapped into different FE models including a perforated plate, a model with a complex surface, and an aero-engine vane component. The mathematical mapping algorithms and formulations are developed for 2D and 3D FE models where residual stress profiles obtained experimentally, numerically, or analytically for different manufacturing processes including shot-peening, water jet machining, milling, turning, roller burnishing, laser machining and peening, electro discharge machining, etc., can be mapped on FE models with complex geometries. The implementation and the results for the mapping techniques are presented and discussed in detail.

Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

FE model for the shot-peening process

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Figure 2

Residual stress profile obtained at shot velocity of 5 m/s

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Figure 3

Perforated plate: (a) geometry and (b) mesh

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Figure 4

Element faces and node sequence for 3D elements in ABAQUS : (a) four node linear tetrahedron element; (b) ten node quadratic tetrahedron element; (c) six node linear wedge element; (d) 15 node quadratic wedge element; (e) eight node linear hexahedron element; and (f) 20 node quadratic hexahedron element

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Figure 5

Element faces and node sequence for 2D elements in ABAQUS : (a) three node linear triangular element; (b) six node quadratic triangular element; (c) four node linear quadrilateral element; and (d) eight node quadratic quadrilateral element.

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Figure 6

Element faces defined by three nodes

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Figure 7

Element faces defined by four nodes

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Figure 8

Element faces defined by two nodes

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Figure 9

Exceptional condition when nodes from the mapping area are not detected

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Figure 10

Global and local 3D Cartesian coordinate systems with reference point A

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Figure 11

Global and local 2D Cartesian coordinate systems with reference point A

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Figure 12

Mapped stress profiles in the x direction using (a) method A and (b) method B

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Figure 13

Mapped stress profiles in the y direction using (a) method A and (b) method B

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Figure 14

Mapped stress profiles in the z direction using (a) method A and (b) method B

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Figure 15

Geometry and mesh of a complex surface subjected to shot-peening

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Figure 16

Mapped shot-peening stress profiles in the (a) x direction; (b) y direction; and (c) z direction

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Figure 17

Mesh of a simplified aero-engine vane subjected to shot-peening

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Figure 18

Mapped stress profiles beneath the shot-peening surface of a simplified aero-engine vane component: (a) von Mises stresses; (b) direct stresses in the x direction; (c) direct stresses in the y direction; and (d) direct stresses in the z direction

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