0
Research Papers

Multiple-Scale Wavelet Decomposition, 3D Surface Feature Exaction and Applications

[+] Author and Article Information
Yi Liao1

 University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109

David A. Stephenson

 University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109

Jun Ni

 University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109liaoyi99@gmail.com

1

Corresponding author.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 134(1), 011005 (Jan 12, 2012) (13 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4005352 History: Received July 09, 2010; Revised October 14, 2011; Published January 12, 2012; Online January 12, 2012

This paper presents a method of applying wavelets to decompose three-dimensional surface into multiple-scale subsurfaces, and of using the subsurface features to predict surface functions and detect machining errors. The one-dimensional discrete wavelet decomposition is first introduced, and then, it is extended to decompose and analyze three-dimensional surfaces. In this study, applications of wavelets decomposition are demonstrated in several automotive case studies, including abrupt tool breakage detection, chatter detection, cylinder head sealing/mating surface leak path detection, and transmission clutch piston surface nonclean up region detection. These case studies successfully demonstrate that the proposed multiple-scale two-channel wavelet decomposition method can be served as a useful tool for surface functions prediction and machining errors detection.

Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Topics: Wavelets
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

(a) An example of 1D profile data measured from a cylinder head surface, (b) Fourier spectrum of profile data in (a)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Multiscale filter bank diagram for 1D wavelet decomposition

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

One-dimensional wavelet decomposition example

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Multiscale two-channel filter bank diagram for 2D wavelet decomposition

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

(a) 3D height map of a cylinder head surface, (b) part of the height map in (a) selected as wavelet decomposition example

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

2D wavelet decomposition example: (a) approximation subsurface a3 , (b) approximation subsurface a4 , (c) detail subsurface D4H+D4V+D4D

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

3D view of 2D wavelet decomposition example: (a) original surface data, (b) approximation subsurface a3 , (c) approximation subsurface a4 , (d) summation of detail subsurfaces D4H+D4V+D4D

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

Border distortion elimination: (a) approximation subsurface a4 before removal of border distortion, (b) surface mask obtained from original surface, (c) approximation subsurface a4 after removal of border distortion

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

(a) Original surface height map of part 1, (b) original surface height map of part 10, (c) detail subsurface D4H+D4V+D4D of part 1 (at level 4), (d) detail subsurface D4H+D4V+D4D of part 10 (at level 4)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

(a)–(b), Plots of parameters St and Sa as defined in function (13) and (14), (c)–(g), plots of energy parameters at wavelet decomposition level 4: (c) Et4¯ total normalized energy, (d) Ea4¯ normalized energy of approximation subsurface, (e)–(g) Eh4¯, Ev4¯, Ed4¯ normalized energy of detail subsurfaces in the horizontal, vertical and diagonal directions

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 11

Example of chatter detection using wavelet decomposition: (a) original surface, (b) approximation subsurface a5 (at level 5), (c) detail subsurface D5H+D5V+D5D (at level 5), (d) binary image shows the chatter marks (in white pixels)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 12

(a) Height map of cylinder head mating surface (b) summation of detail subsurfaces D4H+D4V+D4D (at level 4), (c) possible leak paths (highlight in red) along the combustion chambers

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 13

Wavelet decomposition results of path 1 around the cylinder head combustion chambers

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 14

Peak-to-peak variation (sample length of 10 mm) of detail subprofile at level 4

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 15

(a) Gray image of an example of nonclean up on a transmission clutch piston surface, (b) height map of the surface shown in (a), (c) approximation subsurface a1 (at level 1), (d) the summation of detail subsurfaces D1H+D1V+D1D (at level 1), (e) binary image shows the nonclean up region (in white pixels)

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In