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Technical Briefs

Feasibility and Effectiveness of Heat Pipe Cooling in End Milling Operations: Thermal, Structural Static, and Dynamic Analyses: A New Approach

[+] Author and Article Information
Lin Zhu

School of Engineering, Anhui Agricultural University, Hefei 230036, P.R. China; Mechanical Engineering Department,  University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI 53211

Tien-Chien Jen, Yi-Hsin Yen

Mechanical Engineering Department,  University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI 53211

Xiao-Ling Kong

School of Engineering,  Anhui Agricultural University, Hefei 230036, P.R. China

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 133(5), 054503 (Oct 14, 2011) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4005037 History: Received December 09, 2010; Revised September 05, 2011; Published October 14, 2011; Online October 14, 2011

In this paper, the feasibility and effectiveness of heat pipe cooling in end milling operations are investigated. A new embedded heat pipe technology was utilized to remove the heat generated at the tool-interface in end milling processes. Numerical studies involved four cases, including dry milling, fluid cooling, heat pipe cooling, and heat pipe cooling with cutting fluid supplied. The thermal, structural static, and dynamic characteristics of the end-mill were investigated using a numerical calculation with fast finite element plus solvers based on explicit finite element analysis software. The results demonstrate that the heat pipe end-mill is most feasible and effective in the actual end milling processes.

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Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Three-flute end mill

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Figure 2

Three-flute end-mill (a) without heat pipe and (b) with heat pipe

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Figure 3

The loaded end mill

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Figure 4

Three-flute tool tip

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Figure 5

(a) Temperature distribution on the tool tip and (b) detailed C of (a). Magnified view of the temperature distribution on the tool tip.

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Figure 6

Variation in tool-chip contact length in down milling

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Figure 7

Tool insert model

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Figure 8

Variation of heat source area in down milling

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Figure 9

Plots between the maximum temperatures on the tool tip vs. time (a) dry milling, (b) fluid cooling, (c) heat pipe cooling, and (d) heat pipe cooling with coolant

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Figure 10

The maximum thermal stresses in the cutting time (a) dry milling, (b) fluid cooling, (c) heat pipe cooling, and (d) heat pipe cooling with coolant

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Figure 11

(a) Static stress distribution on the solid end-mill and (b) detailed C of (a) Magnified view of the static stress on the tool

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Figure 12

(a) Static stress distribution on the heat pipe end-mill, (b) detailed C of (a) Magnified view of the static stress on the tool

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Figure 13

Static strain distribution of the (a) solid end-mill and (b) heat pipe end-mill

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Figure 14

Comparative vibration modes between a solid end-mill and a heat pipe end-mill under the clamp length 9.29 mm

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