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Research Papers

Laser Shock Peening of Nanoparticles Integrated Alloys: Numerical Simulation and Experiments

[+] Author and Article Information
Chang Ye

School of Industrial Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47906

Gary J. Cheng

School of Industrial Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47906gjcheng@purdue.edu

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 132(6), 061017 (Dec 21, 2010) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4003124 History: Received April 07, 2010; Revised November 12, 2010; Published December 21, 2010; Online December 21, 2010

Nanocomposite and multiphase structures have become more important nowadays to enhance the mechanical properties of materials. Laser shock peening (LSP) is one of the most efficient ways to increase component fatigue life. In this paper, numerical and experimental studies have been carried out to study the effects of nanoparticles integrated structures during the laser shock peening of aluminum alloys. The LSP experiment of aluminum samples with different particle densities was carried out. The effect of nanoparticle on shock wave propagation, plastic deformation, energy absorption, and residual stress magnitude was studied. A qualitative agreement is found between experiment and simulation. The existence of nanoparticles affects the stress wave propagation and increases the ratio of absorbed energy to total energy and thus the magnitude of residual stress of the material after LSP.

Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Finite element modeling (FEM) model setup and adaptive meshing

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Figure 2

Von Mises stress distribution along the thickness direction at different times during LSP without nanoparticles

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Figure 3

Von Mises stress distribution along the thickness direction at different times during LSP with 100 nm nanoparticles (volume density: 2.5%)

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Figure 4

The FEM simulation result showing the stress concentration surrounding the 100 nm nanoparticles during LSP

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Figure 5

Equivalent plastic strain in the surface for different particle sizes with the same particle numbers after LSP

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Figure 6

Surface curve comparison for different particle volume fractions after LSP

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Figure 7

(a) Bright field and (b) dark field TEM images showing the nanoscale precipitates in Al6061-T6 after LSP

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Figure 8

Sample hardness before and after LSP for different aging times

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Figure 9

Peak displacement after LSP for (a) different PVFs, (b) different aging times, and (c) 3D image showing the peak displacement

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Figure 10

Temporal evolution of total energy, internal energy, and kinetic energy and viscously store energy for the nonparticle case during LSP

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Figure 11

Temporal evolution of internal energy, plastic stored energy, and elastic stored energy for the nonparticle case during LSP

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Figure 12

Ratio of internal energy to total energy for different particle densities during LSP

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Figure 13

(a) The FWHM for samples of different aging times and (b) the spectrum of X-ray diffraction and indication of FWHM

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Figure 14

Overall residual stress distribution

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Figure 15

Surface residual stress comparison between experiment and simulation

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