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Technical Briefs

Experimental Investigation of Microcutting Mechanisms in Marble Grinding

[+] Author and Article Information
LJ. Tanovic

Department of Production Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Kraljice Marije 16, Belgrade 11120, Serbialtanovic@mas.bg.ac.rs

P. Bojanic

Department of Production Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Kraljice Marije 16, Belgrade 11120, Serbiapbojanic@mas.bg.ac.rs

R. Puzovic

Department of Production Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Kraljice Marije 16, Belgrade 11120, Serbiarpuzovic@mas.bg.ac.rs

S. Klimenko

V. Bakul Institute for Superhard Materials, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Avtozavodsky Strasse 2, Kiev 07074, Ukraineatmu@ism.kiev.ua

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 131(6), 064507 (Dec 04, 2009) (5 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4000619 History: Received April 07, 2009; Revised November 05, 2009; Published December 04, 2009; Online December 04, 2009

This paper offers an experimental study of the microcutting mechanisms in marble grinding to aid the optimization of the marble grinding process. The necessity for investigating these mechanisms is dictated by the increased use of marble in many applications and the fact that grinding and polishing processes are the dominant technologies used to meet surface finish requirements in this natural material. The experiments are aimed at the determination of the normal component of the cutting force and of the grain traces in microcutting with a single diamond grain. The investigations carried out make provisions for establishing critical grain penetration and cutting depths and allow the prediction of the normal cutting force component as a function of grain penetration speed and depth.

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Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Deformation and crack formation model during indentation (1=elastic deformation, 2=plastic deformation, 3=crack formation, R-median/radial, and L-lateral) (17)

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Figure 2

Microcutting with a diamond grain with rotary and axial motions—Scheme 1

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Figure 3

Microcutting with a diamond grain with rotary and radial motions—Scheme 2

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Figure 4

Microcutting with a diamond grain under linear motion—Scheme 3

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Figure 5

Experimental setup for measuring the normal component of the microcutting force

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Figure 6

Change in the normal force as a function of grain penetration depth in the VB marble microcutting: (a) scheme 1, (b) scheme 2, and (c) scheme 3

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Figure 7

Change in the normal force as a function of grain penetration depth in the PT marble microcutting: (a) scheme 1, (b) scheme 2, and (c) scheme 3

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Figure 8

Cutting regimes for the VB marble (Vs=7.85 m/s, a=0.01 mm,×63)

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Figure 9

Microcutting trace on the PT marble (Vs=7.85 m/s, a=0.01 mm,×125)

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