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A Comparative Multifield FEA and Experimental Study on the Enhanced Manufacturability of 6061-T6511 Aluminum Using dc Current

[+] Author and Article Information
Amir Khalilollahi

School of Engineering, Penn State Erie, The Behrend College, Erie, PA 16563-1701axk@psu.edu

David H. Johnson

School of Engineering, Penn State Erie, The Behrend College, Erie, PA 16563-1701dhj1@psu.edu

John T. Roth

School of Engineering, Penn State Erie, The Behrend College, Erie, PA 16563-1701jtr11@psu.edu

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 131(6), 064503 (Nov 13, 2009) (5 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4000310 History: Received January 03, 2007; Revised September 08, 2009; Published November 13, 2009; Online November 13, 2009

An electric current, applied during deformation, has been shown to reduce the deformation force/energy, while also increasing the maximum achievable strain and decreasing springback. Considering this, the present work initiates the development of a finite element model to investigate electricity’s thermal/structural effects on a tensile specimen. The model allows the effect of joule-heating to be separated from other nonthermal property changes caused by the electricity. Comparison with experimental tensile testing with respect to the predicted stress-strain behavior and transient temperature profiles demonstrates the model predicts these behaviors adequately. A multifield large deformation finite element model is then developed. The model evaluates the stress-strain characteristics of the material while the specimen is carrying a large dc current and is being deformed, incorporating the effect of thermal softening. The simulation results are compared with surface infrared temperature measurements in order to verify the finite element model and then to actual deformation results in order to attain more qualitative and quantitative insight into the effects of the electric field.

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Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Schematic of the electrical arrangement

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Figure 2

Thermal conductivity and specific heat of 6061-T6511 aluminum

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Figure 3

Electrical resistivity and thermal expansion coefficient for 6061-T6511 aluminum

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Figure 4

FE input stress-strain curves for 6061-T6511 aluminum at different temperatures

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Figure 5

Finite element mesh of specimen and BC

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Figure 6

2D map of temperatures at 17.5 s. Features of experiment setup are shown as annotations.

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Figure 7

Comparison of experimental and ANSYS model temperatures for 5 s, 10 s, and 17.5 s of operation

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Figure 8

Necking and deformation of the bar at 17 s (radial deformation, m)

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Figure 9

Necking and failure of the bar at 17.4 s

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Figure 10

Centerline temperatures at different times during the simulation

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Figure 11

Axial variation in plastic strain at different times during the simulation

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Figure 12

Comparison of experimental and FE models for loading without current

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Figure 13

Comparison of experimental and FE models for loading with current

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