0
Research Papers

Effective Determination of Feed Direction and Tool Orientation in Five-Axis Flat-End Milling

[+] Author and Article Information
M. Javad Barakchi Fard

Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, N6A 5B9, Canadambarakch@uwo.ca

Hsi-Yung Feng

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z4, Canadafeng@mech.ubc.ca

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 132(6), 061011 (Nov 29, 2010) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4002766 History: Received July 17, 2009; Revised October 05, 2010; Published November 29, 2010; Online November 29, 2010

This paper addresses the challenging problem of determining feed direction and tool orientation at a given cutter contact (CC) point in five-axis free-form surface machining with flat-end mills. The objective is to efficiently determine a feed direction and tool orientation that will avoid both local and global tool gouging and yield a near maximum machining strip width at the CC point. Concurrent determination of the optimal feed direction and tool orientation is a very computationally intensive task and searching for the correct solution would involve exhaustive evaluations of the machining strip width at many feed directions and tool orientations. In this paper, the optimal feed directions and analytical solutions for the optimal tool orientations in five-axis flat-end milling of spherical, cylindrical, and toroidal surfaces are identified first. A toroidal surface inscription method is devised to approximate the local surface geometry at a CC point on a free-form surface by an inscribed toroidal surface. Analytical solutions for toroidal surface machining are then employed to position the flat-end mill at the CC point with the tool feeding in the best toroidal surface inscribing direction. Case studies have demonstrated that the proposed method can efficiently determine a feed direction and tool orientation, corresponding to a near maximum machining strip width.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Relevant geometric elements in five-axis flat-end milling at a CC point

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Toroidal surfaces: (a) concave, (b) saddle, and (c) convex

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Cylindrical surface machining in the three-contact-point situation

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Saddle toroidal surface machining geometry: (a) three-contact-point situation, (b) on the t-n plane, and (c) on a plane parallel to f and passing through Pc and O

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Geometry of Sa residing on the scallop surface in saddle toroidal surface machining: (a) on the t-n plane and (b) on a plane parallel to f and passing through Sa and O

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

Typical differences between β3C′ and β3C in concave toroidal surface machining

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 12

Machined geometry of a tool path generated by following the optimal feed direction at each CC point: (a) optimal β and (b) β=0

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 13

Variation of machining strip width along the tool path shown in Fig. 1

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 14

Machining of a cylindrical surface along the optimal feed direction: (a) optimal β and (b) β=0

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Concave toroidal surface machining geometry: (a) Pc′ touching the scallop surface, (b) on the f-n plane, and (c) on a plane parallel to t and passing through Pc′ and O

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Geometry of Sa residing on the scallop surface in concave toroidal surface machining: (a) on the f-n plane and (b) on a plane parallel to t and passing through Sa and O

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

Intersection of BTC and elliptical intersection curve of bottom tool plane and scallop surface: (a) at ϕ and β=0 and (b) at ϕmax

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

Typical free-form surface patches for the case studies

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 11

Variation of machining strip width with f and β at a typical CC point

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In