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Research Papers

Effects of Temperature on Laser Shock Induced Plastic Deformation: The Case of Copper

[+] Author and Article Information
Chang Ye

School of Industrial Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47906

Gary J. Cheng

School of Industrial Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47906gjcheng@purdue.edu

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 132(6), 061009 (Nov 10, 2010) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4002849 History: Received January 09, 2010; Revised September 07, 2010; Published November 10, 2010; Online November 10, 2010

Laser shock induced plastic deformation has been used widely, such as laser shock peening (LSP), laser dynamic forming (LDF), and laser peen forming. These processes have been extensively studied both numerically and experimentally at room temperature. Recently, it is found that at elevated temperature, laser shock induced plastic deformation can generate better formability in LDF and enhanced mechanical properties in LSP. For example, warm laser shock peening leads to improved residual stress stability and better fatigue performance in aluminum alloys. There is a need to investigate the effects of elevated temperature on deformation behavior of metallic materials during shock induced high strain rate deformation. In this study, LSP of copper are selected to systematically study the effects of elevated temperature in shock induced high strain rate deformation. Finite element modeling (FEM) is used to predict the deformation behavior. The FEM simulation results of surface profile and residual stress distribution after LSP are validated by experimental results. The validated FEM simulation is used to study the effects of temperature on the plastic deformation behaviors during LSP, such as plastic affected zone, stress/strain distribution, and energy absorption.

Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 7

Residual stress after LSP along beam center from simulation and experiment for different temperatures at laser intensity: 10.6 GW/cm2, at temperature (a) 300 K and (b) 400 K

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Figure 8

Peak compressive residual stress after LSP for different laser intensities and different temperatures from FEA model

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Figure 9

Hydrodynamic and elastic-plastic shock wave attenuation in-depth during LSP for 6.3 GPa plasma pressure (laser intensity 5.4 GW/cm2) at 300 K

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Figure 10

Strain rate changes with time during LSP for: (a) different temperatures at same laser intensity (4.1 GW/cm2) and (b) different laser intensities at same temperature (300 K)

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Figure 11

Flow stress during LSP: (a) for different temperatures at the same laser intensity 4.1 GW/cm2 and (b) different laser intensities at same temperature 300 K

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Figure 12

(a) History of total external work, internal energy, kinetic energy, and viscously dissipated energy. (b) History of internal energy, plastically stored energy, and elastically stored energy; laser intensity: 6.9 GW/cm2, temperature 300 K.

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Figure 13

Comparison of peak plastic strain in zz (depth) direction at different laser intensities and temperatures

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Figure 14

In-depth residual stress (a) for different laser intensities at 300 K and (b) for different temperatures at laser intensity 10.6 GW/cm2

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Figure 15

Comparison of plastic affected depth after LSP at different laser intensities and temperatures

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Figure 6

Maximal displacement at different laser intensities and temperatures comparison between simulation and experiment (exp: experiment; sim: simulation)

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Figure 5

Comparison of surface contour after LSP between experiment and simulation (laser intensity 6.9 GPa/cm2, temperature 400 K)

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Figure 4

Schematic view of model setup in ABAQUS

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Figure 3

(a) Yield stress at different strain rates, atmosphere pressure, and temperature 300 K and (b) yield stress at different temperatures, strain rate 1×106 s−1, atmosphere pressure

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Figure 2

Laser generated plasma pressure temporal profile (laser intensity=4.1 GW/cm2, pulsed laser duration at full width at half maximum (FWHM))

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Figure 1

Schematic view of laser shock peening process

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