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Research Papers

Formability of Al 5xxx Sheet Metals Using Pulsed Current for Various Heat Treatments

[+] Author and Article Information
Wesley A. Salandro, Joshua J. Jones1

Behrend College Mechanical Engineering, Penn State Erie, 4701 College Drive, Erie, PA 16563

Timothy A. McNeal

Behrend College Mechanical Engineering, Penn State Erie, 4701 College Drive, Erie, PA 16563

John T. Roth2

Behrend College Mechanical Engineering, Penn State Erie, 4701 College Drive, Erie, PA 16563

Sung-Tae Hong3

Energy Materials and Manufacturing Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard, Richland, WA 99352

Mark T. Smith

Energy Materials and Manufacturing Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard, Richland, WA 99352

1

Present address: Clemson University International Center for Automotive Research (CUICAR), Greenville, SC.

2

Corresponding author.

3

Present address: University of Ulsan, School of Mechanical and Automotive Engineering, South Korea.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 132(5), 051016 (Oct 05, 2010) (11 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4002185 History: Received August 27, 2008; Revised March 30, 2010; Published October 05, 2010; Online October 05, 2010

Previous studies have shown that the presence of a pulsed electrical current, applied during the deformation process of an aluminum specimen, can significantly improve the formability of the aluminum without heating the metal above its maximum operating temperature range. The research herein extends these findings by examining the effect of electrical pulsing on 5052 and 5083 aluminum alloys. Two different parameter sets were used while pulsing three different heat-treatments (as-is, 398°C, and 510°C) for each of the two aluminum alloys. For this research, the electrical pulsing is applied to the aluminum while the specimens are deformed without halting the deformation process (a manufacturing technique known as electrically assisted manufacturing). The analysis focuses on establishing the effect of the electrical pulsing has on the aluminum alloy’s various heat-treatments by examining the displacement of the material throughout the testing region of dogbone-shaped specimens. The results from this research show that pulsing significantly increases the maximum achievable elongation of the aluminum (when compared with baseline tests conducted without electrical pulsing). Another beneficial effect produced by electrical pulsing is that the engineering flow stress within the material is considerably reduced. The electrical pulses also cause the aluminum to deform nonuniformly, such that the material exhibits a diffuse neck where the minimum deformation occurs near the ends of the specimen (near the clamps) and the maximum deformation occurs near the center of the specimen (where fracture ultimately occurs). This diffuse necking effect is similar to what can be experienced during superplastic deformation. However, when comparing the presence of a diffuse neck in this research, electrical pulsing does not create as significant of a diffuse neck as superplastic deformation. Electrical pulsing has the potential to be more efficient than the traditional methods of incremental forming since the deformation process is never interrupted. Overall, with the greater elongation and lower stress, the aluminum can be deformed quicker, easier, and to a greater extent than is currently possible.

Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

5754 aluminum with decreasing pulse period

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Figure 2

Experimental setup

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Figure 3

Circuit schematic

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Figure 4

Displacement grid

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Figure 5

Electrical pulsing pattern

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Pulsed specimen with diffuse neck

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Figure 7

5052—as-is—parameter set 1

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Figure 8

5052—as-is—parameter set 2

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5052—as-is—axial strain profile

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Figure 10

5052—398°C—parameter set 1

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5052—398°C—parameter set 2

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5052—398°C—axial strain profile

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5052—510°C—parameter set 1

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5052—510°C—parameter set 2

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5052—510°C—axial strain profile

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5083—as-is—parameter set 1

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5083—as-is—parameter set 2

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Figure 18

5083—as-is—axial strain profile

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5083—398°C—parameter set 1

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5083—398°C—parameter set 2

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Figure 21

5083—398°C—axial strain profile

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Figure 22

5083—510°C—parameter set 1

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Figure 23

5083—510°C—parameter set 2

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Figure 24

5083—510°C—axial strain profile

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