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Research Papers

Effect of Microstructural Parameters on the Machinability of Aligned Carbon Nanotube Composites

[+] Author and Article Information
Johnson Samuel

Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801jsamuel@illinois.edu

Shiv G. Kapoor

Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801sgkapoor@illinois.edu

Richard E. DeVor

Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801redevor@illinois.edu

K. Jimmy Hsia

Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801kjhsia@illinois.edu

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 132(5), 051012 (Oct 05, 2010) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4002495 History: Received July 07, 2009; Revised August 13, 2010; Published October 05, 2010; Online October 05, 2010

The objective of this paper is to understand through parametric studies the effect of microstructural parameters, viz., the carbon nanotube (CNT) orientation with respect to the cutting direction, CNT loading, and level of dispersion within the matrix on the machinability of aligned CNT composites. To this end, a microstructure-based finite element machining model is used to simulate microstructures containing 1.5% and 6% by weight of CNTs. Microstructures with both uniform and nonuniform dispersions of CNTs are simulated. For each of these cases, CNTs having orientations of 0 deg, 45 deg, 90 deg, and 135 deg to the cutting direction are studied. The machining simulations were conducted using a positive rake tool. Chip morphology, cutting forces, surface roughness, and surface/subsurface damages are the machinability measures used for comparison. The results of the parametric studies demonstrate that the CNT orientation, loading, and level of dispersion all play a critical role in dictating the machining response of aligned composites. The results further indicate that the surface morphology of the machined surface can be harnessed to produce the next generation of microfluidic devices. This application demonstrates the feasibility of designing the microstructure of CNT composites by taking into account both their engineering functionality and machinability.

Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Microstructure simulation strategy (13)

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Figure 2

Validation of the chip morphology results (10)

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Figure 3

Image of aligned multiwalled carbon nanotube composite (size of image of 5×2 μm2) (4)

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Figure 4

Simulated microstructures (overall size of 4×2 μm2) for composite A (1.5% CNT loading)

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Figure 5

Fiber orientation conventions (5)

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Figure 6

Chip formation at 90 deg orientation in composite A

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Figure 7

Shear plane formation at 0 deg orientation

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Figure 8

Chips formed at 45 deg orientation for composite B

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Figure 9

Shear plane formation at 45 deg orientation

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Figure 10

Chips formed at 90 deg orientation for composite B

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Figure 11

Shear plane formation at 135 deg orientation

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Figure 12

Machined surface morphology at various orientations (uniformly dispersed microstructure)

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Figure 13

Distinct bending of the CNTs at 90 deg orientation

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Figure 14

Examples of active mixing in microfluidic channels

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Figure 15

Progressive failure in composite B 90 deg orientation (uniform dispersion and negative rake)

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