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Research Papers

Identification of Material Constitutive Laws for Machining—Part II: Generation of the Constitutive Data and Validation of the Constitutive Law

[+] Author and Article Information
Bin Shi

Department of Mechanical Engineering, McGill University, 817 Sherbrooke Street, West, Montreal, QC, H3A 2K6, Canada; Aerospace Manufacturing Technology Centre, Institute for Aerospace Research, National Research Council Canada, 5145 Avenue, Decelles, Montreal, QC, H3T 2B2, Canadabin.shi@nrc.ca

Helmi Attia

Department of Mechanical Engineering, McGill University, 817 Sherbrooke Street, West, Montreal, QC, H3A 2K6, Canada; Aerospace Manufacturing Technology Centre, Institute for Aerospace Research, National Research Council Canada, 5145 Avenue, Decelles, Montreal, QC, H3T 2B2, Canadahelmi.attia@nrc.ca

Nejah Tounsi

Aerospace Manufacturing Technology Centre, Institute for Aerospace Research, National Research Council Canada, 5145 Avenue, Decelles, Montreal, QC, H3T 2B2, Canadanejah.tounsi@nrc.ca

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 132(5), 051009 (Sep 27, 2010) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4002455 History: Received January 23, 2009; Revised June 15, 2010; Published September 27, 2010; Online September 27, 2010

This paper presents an integral methodology to obtain a wide range of constitutive data required for the identification of the constitutive equation used in simulating cutting processes. This methodology is based on combining the distributed primary zone deformation (DPZD) model developed in Part I (Shi, 2010, ASME J. Manuf. Sci. Eng., 132, p. 051008.) of this study with quasi-static indentation (QSI) tests, orthogonal cutting tests at room temperature (RT) and high temperature. The QSI tests are used to capture the material properties in the quasi-static conditions, which solve the unstable solutions for the coefficients of the constitutive law. The RT cutting tests are designed to fulfill the assumptions embedded in the developed DPZD model in order to provide the distributed constitutive data encountered in the primary shear zone. To capture the material behavior in the secondary shear zone, the orthogonal cutting tests with a laser preheating system are designed to raise the temperature in the primary zone to the level encountered in the secondary zone. As an application of the generated constitutive data, the Johnson–Cook model is identified for Inconel 718. This constitutive law is further validated using high speed split Hopkinson pressure bar tests and orthogonal cutting tests combined with finite element simulations. In comparison with the previous approaches reported in the open literature, the developed DPZD model and methodology significantly improve the accuracy of the simulation results.

Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

The approach followed for generating the constitutive data and identifying the constitutive law

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Figure 2

Testing points on the Inconel 718 sample of the QSI tests

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Figure 3

Principle of the QSI test (20)

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Figure 4

True stress versus true plastic strain of Inconel 718 measured from the QSI tests at T=20°C

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Figure 5

Yield stress versus temperature of Inconel 718

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Figure 6

Experimental setup of the orthogonal cutting tests

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Figure 7

Measured cutting and thrust forces with machining time for RT1

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Figure 8

The constitutive data obtained from the RT cutting tests

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Figure 9

Distributions of σ¯, ε¯, ε¯̇, and T of obtained from cutting test RT1 with the DPZD model: (a) temperature, (b) effective strain, (c) effective strain rate, and (d) effective stress; the insert shows the location of Pi in the primary zone

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Figure 10

Measured cutting and thrust forces with machining time for HT2

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Figure 11

The constitutive data obtained from the HT cutting tests

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Figure 12

The flow stress of Inconel 718 based on JC model

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Figure 13

Inserts designed for preventing the indentation

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Figure 14

Comparison of the flow stresses predicted by the proposed, Oxley’s, and Tounsi’s methods with the SHPB test data at room temperature and ε¯̇=1100 s−1

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Figure 15

Comparison of the predicted cutting forces using the JC law based on the developed methodology, Oxley’s, and Tounsi’s methods with the experimental result (V=11 m/min, tu=0.2 mm, and γ=0 deg)

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