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Research Papers

Identification of Material Constitutive Laws for Machining—Part I: An Analytical Model Describing the Stress, Strain, Strain Rate, and Temperature Fields in the Primary Shear Zone in Orthogonal Metal Cutting

[+] Author and Article Information
Bin Shi

Department of Mechanical Engineering, McGill University, 817 Sherbrooke Street West, Montreal, QC, H3A 2K6, Canada; Aerospace Manufacturing Technology Centre, Institute for Aerospace Research, National Research Council Canada, 5145 Avenue Decelles, Montreal, QC, H3T 2B2, Canadabin.shi@nrc.ca

Helmi Attia

Department of Mechanical Engineering, McGill University, 817 Sherbrooke Street West, Montreal, QC, H3A 2K6, Canada; Aerospace Manufacturing Technology Centre, Institute for Aerospace Research, National Research Council Canada, 5145 Avenue Decelles, Montreal, QC, H3T 2B2, Canadahelmi.attia@nrc.ca

Nejah Tounsi

Aerospace Manufacturing Technology Centre, Institute for Aerospace Research, National Research Council Canada, 5145 Avenue Decelles, Montreal, QC, H3T 2B2, Canadanejah.tounsi@nrc.ca

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 132(5), 051008 (Sep 27, 2010) (11 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4002454 History: Received January 23, 2009; Revised June 15, 2010; Published September 27, 2010; Online September 27, 2010

To achieve high performance machining, modeling of the cutting process is necessary to predict cutting forces, residual stresses, tool wear, and burr formation. A major difficulty in the modeling of the cutting process is the description of the material constitutive law to reflect the severe plastic deformation encountered in the primary and the secondary deformation zones under high strains, strain rates, and temperatures. A critical literature review shows that the available methods to identify the material constitutive equation for the cutting process may lead to significant errors due to their limitations. To overcome these limitations, a novel methodology is developed in this study. Through conceptual considerations and finite element simulations, the characteristics of the stress, strain, strain rate, and temperature fields in the primary shear zone were established. Using this information and applying the principles of the theory of plasticity, heat transfer, and mechanics of the orthogonal metal cutting, a new distributed primary zone deformation model is developed to describe the distributions of the effective stress, effective strain, effective strain rate, and temperature in the primary shear zone. This analytical model is assessed by comparing its predictions with finite element simulation results under a wide range of cutting conditions using different materials. Experimental validation of this model will be presented in Part II of this study.

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Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Parallel-sided shear zone model

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Figure 2

Characteristics of the plastic deformation process in the primary zone: (a) temperature distribution (experiment (25)), (b) strain distribution (experiment (20)), (c) strain rate distribution (experiment (20)), and (d) proposed flow stress profile compared with stress distribution reported in Ref. 24

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Figure 3

Typical shape of the primary shear zone in the steady state from FE simulations (workpiece: AISI 1045: V=120 m/min, tu=0.2 mm, and γ=6 deg)

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Figure 4

Typical distributions of the plastic deformation in the primary zone based on FE simulations

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Figure 5

Flow chart of the derivations of the distributions of σ¯, ε¯, ε¯̇, and T in the primary shear zone

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Figure 6

Distributions of σ¯, ε¯, ε¯̇, and T in the primary zone (workpiece: AISI 1045, cutting condition: V=200 m/min, tu=0.15 mm, and γ=0 deg)

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