0
Research Papers

Tool Orientation Optimization Considering Second Order Kinematical Performance of the Multi-Axis Machine

[+] Author and Article Information
Tao Ye

State Key Laboratory of Digital Manufacturing Equipment and Technology of China, School of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074, P.R. Chinataoye@smail.hust.edu.cn

Cai-Hua Xiong1

State Key Laboratory of Digital Manufacturing Equipment and Technology of China, School of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074, P.R. Chinachxiong@mail.hust.edu.cn

You-Lun Xiong

State Key Laboratory of Digital Manufacturing Equipment and Technology of China, School of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074, P.R. China

Can Zhao

Modern Manufacture Engineering Center, Heilongjiang University of Science and Technology, Harbin 150027, P.R. China

1

Corresponding author.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 132(5), 051006 (Sep 22, 2010) (11 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4002456 History: Received June 12, 2009; Revised August 07, 2010; Published September 22, 2010; Online September 22, 2010

This paper presents a new tool orientation optimization approach for multi-axis machining considering up to second order kinematical performance of the multi-axis machine. Different from the traditional optimization approach, tool orientations are optimized with the goal of improving the kinematical performance of the machining process, not only increasing the material removal from purely geometrical aspect. The procedure is to first determine a few key orientations on the part surface along the tool path according to the curvature variation. Key orientations are initially optimized to be able to achieve high material removal by comparing the tool swept curve and the actual part surface. Intermediate orientations between key orientations are interpolated smoothly using rigid body interpolation techniques on SO(3). The time-optimal trajectory planning problem with velocity and acceleration constraints of the multi-axis machine is then solved to adjust the initially determined tool orientations to better exploit the multi-axis machine’s motion capacity. Simulation and experiment validate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed approach.

Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Cutting width orthogonal to the feeding direction is maximized in point milling

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Maximal deviation between the tool swept curve and the part surface is minimized

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

The relationship between the inflection point on the tool path, the position where B axis changes direction, and the cutting mark on the blade surface

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Determining ITAs on zigzag and spiral shaped tool path pattern

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Relationship between the tool orientation and corresponding machine kinematical configuration

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Blade surface model

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Cutter location path around the blade surface

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

Curvature analysis of one cycle of tool path and places where ITAs are placed

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

B/C position given the optimized tool orientations when the machine works under its maximal motion capacity

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

(a) B/C velocity profile. (b) B/C velocity profile: a locally enlarged view.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 11

(a) B/C acceleration profile. (b) B/C acceleration profile: a locally enlarged view.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 12

Tool orientation distribution after optimization (only part of all orientations is plotted for visualization concerns)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 13

The machining result of rotor blade

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 14

Comparison between the method proposed in this paper and the relative to drive method

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 15

The motion of B axis before and after optimization

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 16

Vibration waves appear around the edge of the blade surface

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 17

Simulation based method searching for optimal tool orientations

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 18

Generating smooth transition from productive tool paths and nonproductive tool paths

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 19

Geometric definition of three typical types of tools

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In