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Research Papers

Laser Transmission Welding of Nylon Tubes and Plates

[+] Author and Article Information
A Kritskiy

Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Queen’s University, Kingston, ON, K7L 3N6, Canadakritskiy@me.queensu.ca

G. Zak

Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Queen’s University, Kingston, ON, K7L 3N6, Canadazak@me.queensu.ca

P. J. Bates

Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Royal Military College of Canada, P.O. Box 17000, Station Forces, Kingston, ON, K7K 7B4, Canadabates-p@rmc.ca

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 132(5), 051002 (Sep 10, 2010) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4002191 History: Received February 10, 2010; Revised July 01, 2010; Published September 10, 2010; Online September 10, 2010

In this study, nylon tubes were welded to nylon plaques using laser transmission welding. A conical mirror inserted inside the tube was used to guide the laser beam along the weld path around the inner circumference of the tube. The effect of beam location with respect to the tip of conical mirror on beam distortion was modeled and assessed experimentally. The effects of the laser power, the angular speed, and the number of passes on the joint shear strength were examined. Process parameters that gave good joint strengths were identified.

Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Schematic of the experimental setup for two-dimensional characterization of the power intensity profile of the laser beam reflected from the conical mirror

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Figure 2

Laser beam spot location on the mirror (top view): (a) parallel orientation and (b) perpendicular orientation

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Figure 3

Ray projection from a cone to a vertical cylinder

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Figure 4

General shape of a rectangular beam reflected from the conical mirror to the cylindrical surface for the beam oriented perpendicular to the cone’s radial direction

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Figure 5

The mark made by the laser beam reflected from the conical mirror to the flat plaque clamped to the mirror rod. Laser beam oriented perpendicular to the cone's radial direction.

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Figure 6

General shape of a rectangular beam reflected from the conical mirror to the cylindrical surface for the beam oriented parallel to the cone’s radial direction

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Figure 7

The mark made by the laser beam reflected from the conical mirror to the flat plaque clamped to the mirror rod. Beam oriented parallel to the cone's radial direction.

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Figure 8

The test specimen for tube-to-plaque joining experiments

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Figure 9

Setup for tube-to-plaque joining experiments

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Figure 10

Reflection of the laser beam from the conical mirror

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Figure 11

Tensile test setup

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Figure 12

Force-elongation curves from the tensile test (120 rpm, 16 W)

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Figure 13

Force at failure as a function of the number of rotations for 120 rpm

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Figure 14

Weld strength as a function of the number of rotations for 120 rpm

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Figure 15

Force at failure as a function of the number of rotations for 240 rpm

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Figure 16

Weld strength as a function of the number of rotations for 240 rpm

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Figure 17

Weld strength as a function of the energy input

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