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Special Section: Micromanufacturing

An Experimental Evaluation of an Atomization-Based Cutting Fluid Application System for Micromachining

[+] Author and Article Information
Martin B. Jun

Department of Mechanical Engineering,  University of Victoria, BC, Canada, V8W 3P6

Suhas S. Joshi1

Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering,  University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801

Richard E. DeVor, Shiv G. Kapoor

Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering,  University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801

1

Associate Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay, India.

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 130(3), 031118 (Jun 12, 2008) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2738961 History: Received October 13, 2006; Revised January 22, 2007; Published June 12, 2008

An atomization-based cutting fluid application system is developed for micro-end milling. The system was designed to ensure spreading of the droplets on the workpiece surface based on the analysis of the atomized droplet impingement dynamics. The results of the initial experiments conducted to examine the viability of the system show that the cutting forces are lower and tool life is significantly improved with the atomized cutting fluids when compared to dry and flood cooling methods. Also, application of atomized cutting fluid is found to result in good chip evacuation and lower cutting temperature. Experiments were also conducted to study the effect of fluid properties on cutting performance, and the results show that cutting fluids with lower surface tension and higher viscosity perform better in terms of cutting forces.

Copyright © 2008 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Topics: Fluids , Cutting
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References

Figures

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Figure 2

Setup for the new atomization-based cutting fluid application system

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Figure 3

Peak-to-valley cutting forces at the feed rates of (a) 0.33 and (b) 1.0μm∕flute

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Figure 4

Wear of the micro-end mill after (a) dry cutting 5 slots and (b) wet cutting 45 slots

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Figure 5

Photographs of burrs at the feed rate of 0.33μm∕flute

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Figure 6

Clustered chips on the workpiece with conventional cutting fluid application

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Figure 7

Photographs of slot bottom with adhered chips

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Figure 8

Photographs of tool wear after cutting (a) 30 slots with flood cooling and (b) 45 slots with atomized fluid

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Figure 9

Schematic of the setup for temperature measurement

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Figure 10

Results of temperature measurements at the feed rate of 0.44μm∕flute

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Figure 11

Results of temperature measurements at the feed rate of 1.33μm∕flute

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Figure 12

Photographs of generated chips for the conditions of (a) dry, (b) flood cooling, and (c) atomization-based cooling

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Figure 13

Peak-to-valley cutting forces (a) and surface roughness (b) with different cutting fluids

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Figure 14

Photographs of generated chips at the feed rate of 0.2μm∕flute with (a) Castrol 6519 cutting fluid and (b) DI

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Figure 15

Photographs of chip thickness at the feed rate of 2.0μm∕flute with (a) Castrol 6519 cutting fluid and (b) DI

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Figure 16

Experimental results at different droplet impingment velocities

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Figure 1

An atomization-based cutting fluid application system

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