0
Special Section: Micromanufacturing

Microstructure-Level Machining Simulation of Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Polymer Composites—Part II: Model Interpretation and Application

[+] Author and Article Information
A. Dikshit, J. Samuel, R. E. DeVor, S. G. Kapoor

Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801

J. Manuf. Sci. Eng 130(3), 031115 (May 23, 2008) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2927431 History: Received November 14, 2007; Revised January 16, 2008; Published May 23, 2008

The microstructure-level finite element machining model developed in Part I of this paper is used to perform a detailed analysis of the failure mechanisms that occur while machining the carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforced polycarbonate composites. The chip formation in plain polycarbonate (PC) is seen to be influenced by the ductile failure mode. For the composite containing 1.75% by weight of CNTs (Composite A), the polymer fails in the ductile mode. The presence of CNTs is seen to result in CNTs protruding from the machined surface and subsurface damage. The low thermal conductivity of the polymer phase is seen to result in the formation of adiabatic shear bands in plain PC and Composite A. As the CNT loading is increased to 5% by weight, the failure in the polymer phase is seen to be predominantly brittle in nature. The presence of the larger percentage of CNTs is also seen to offset the formation of adiabatic shear bands. The machining model has also been used to successfully predict the machining behavior of CNT composites with tailored microstructures. Simulation experiments with varying CNT alignment, aspect ratio, percentage loading, and cutting velocity were conducted to study the effects of these factors on cutting forces. The results show that the machining model in combination with the material model is an effective tool to design CNT composites with emphasis both on the mechanical properties and machinability.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2008 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Temperature distribution in chip: (a) Composite A showing the presence of adiabatic shear bands; and (b) Composite B showing the absence of shear bands

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

PC chip formation process at a depth of cut of 700nm and a cutting velocity of 4mm∕s

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Composite A chip formation process at a depth of cut of 700nm and a cutting velocity of 4mm∕s

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

SEM image floor of the machined slot showing the presence of CNTs

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Cutting force for Case 4 of the machining simulations for PC and Composite A

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Composite B chip formation and temperature distribution at a depth of cut of 700nm and a cutting velocity of 4mm∕s

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Cutting force for Case 4 of the machining simulations for Composites A and B

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

Two-way diagrams for significant two-factor interactions

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Related

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In